Character Analysis - Burgamy 1 Morgan Burgamy Ms Bowlin English 1102 12 April 2017 Psychoanalytic Character Analysis of the Narrator in \u201cCathedral\u201d

Character Analysis - Burgamy 1 Morgan Burgamy Ms Bowlin...

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Burgamy 1Morgan Burgamy Ms. BowlinEnglish 110212 April 2017Psychoanalytic Character Analysis of the Narrator in “Cathedral” by Raymond CarverIn Carver’s short story, “Cathedral”, we are exposed to the narrator, another in Carver’s, as Mark Facknitz states, “series of unattractive types” (292). “Cathedral” unfolds with the narrator and also the husband of the short story being antsy about his wife’s friend, Robert, a blind man, coming over to his house. From the beginning of the story, the narrator is not a likablecharacter because of his two-dimensional views on everything and his discomfort with having Robert over. As the story progresses the narrator is blown away by his capabilities and how they disprove all of his past viewpoints on blind men. As the story closes and the two men draw a cathedral together you can see a complete alteration of the narrator’s character. Through this impactful experience Robert gave to him he became able to see the world in a different perspective. Following his character profile throughout the entire story provides the audience with a better understanding and depth to “Cathedral” and allows readers to see past his presented traits.The narrator is described and presented as an unlikeable man that readers do not want to sympathize with. He is a man that exhibits apathy towards many things; you can see this in the text when he refers to his wife’s suicide attempt as her just getting sick and having to throw up (Carver 2). Charles May tells us, the background that is shared with us about the other charactersand the narrator's reaction to it is another example of his apathy within the story (1). He lives with a fixed aspect on life, because of this he carries prejudice; “...an insensitive character who
Burgamy 2has prejudiced notions about a variety of subjects. For example, his only notion of blind people comes from films, and he asks if the blind man’s wife was “a Negro” only because her name wasBeulah” (May 1). The narrator also is jealous over the men in his wife’s life, Robert and her first husband. Carver shows us this trait through the text when the narrator refuses to name her wife’s ex-husband, “Her officer—why should he have a name? he was the childhood sweetheart, and what more does he want?” He also refers to him as the “man who’d first enjoyed her favors” (1-2). He also is jealous of Robert because of the shared past and connection they have with one another. He is a lonely alcoholic that has no friends (Carver 3). His lack of social traits and his insensitive ways root off of his isolation. He does not connect with others and chooses to exist in

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