Designing for Emerging Technologies_ UX for Genomics, Robotics, and the Internet of Things ( PDFDriv - Designing for Emerging Technologies Design not

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Unformatted text preview: Designing for Emerging Technologies Design not only provides the framework for how technolog y works and how it’s used, but also places it in a broader context that includes the total ecosystem with which it interacts and the possibility of unintended consequences. If you’re a UX designer or engineer open to complexity and dissonant ideas, this book is a revelation. you’re looking for insights into how to “ Ifdesign the future today, look no further.” —Dan Saffer Author of Microinteractions “ This book is a must-read for anyone involved in innovative product design, new business creation, or technology research for near future applications. The wide collection of essays offers a wild ride across multiple disciplines. ” —Carla Diana Creative Technologist and author US $49.99 CAN $52.99 ISBN: 978-1-449-37051-0 Erin Rae Hoffer Steven Keating Brook Kennedy Dirk Knemeyer Barry Kudrowitz Gershom Kutliroff Michal Levin Matt Nish-Lapidus Marco Righetto Juhan Sonin Designing for Emerging Technologies UX FOR GENOMICS, ROBOTICS, AND THE INTERNET OF THINGS Scott Stropkay ​Scott Sullivan Hunter Whitney Yaron Yanai About the editor: Jonathan Follett is a principal at Involution Studios where he is a designer and an internationally published author on the topics of user experience and information design. Twitter: @oreillymedia facebook.com/oreilly Follett USER EXPERIENCE/DESIGN Bill Hartman Designing for Emerging Technologies The recent digital and mobile revolutions are a minor Contributors include: blip compared to the next wave of technological Stephen Anderson change, as everything from robot swarms to skinMartin Charlier top embeddable computers and bio printable organs Lisa deBettencourt start appearing in coming years. In this collection of Jeff Faneuff inspiring essays, designers, engineers, and researchers discuss their approaches to experience design for Andy Goodman groundbreaking technologies. Camille Goudeseune Jonathan Follett, Editor Foreword by Saul Kaplan Designing for Emerging Technologies Design not only provides the framework for how technolog y works and how it’s used, but also places it in a broader context that includes the total ecosystem with which it interacts and the possibility of unintended consequences. If you’re a UX designer or engineer open to complexity and dissonant ideas, this book is a revelation. you’re looking for insights into how to “ Ifdesign the future today, look no further.” —Dan Saffer Author of Microinteractions “ This book is a must-read for anyone involved in innovative product design, new business creation, or technology research for near future applications. The wide collection of essays offers a wild ride across multiple disciplines. ” —Carla Diana Creative Technologist and author US $49.99 CAN $52.99 ISBN: 978-1-449-37051-0 Erin Rae Hoffer Steven Keating Brook Kennedy Dirk Knemeyer Barry Kudrowitz Gershom Kutliroff Michal Levin Matt Nish-Lapidus Marco Righetto Juhan Sonin Designing for Emerging Technologies UX FOR GENOMICS, ROBOTICS, AND THE INTERNET OF THINGS Scott Stropkay ​Scott Sullivan Hunter Whitney Yaron Yanai About the editor: Jonathan Follett is a principal at Involution Studios where he is a designer and an internationally published author on the topics of user experience and information design. Twitter: @oreillymedia facebook.com/oreilly Follett USER EXPERIENCE/DESIGN Bill Hartman Designing for Emerging Technologies The recent digital and mobile revolutions are a minor Contributors include: blip compared to the next wave of technological Stephen Anderson change, as everything from robot swarms to skinMartin Charlier top embeddable computers and bio printable organs Lisa deBettencourt start appearing in coming years. In this collection of Jeff Faneuff inspiring essays, designers, engineers, and researchers discuss their approaches to experience design for Andy Goodman groundbreaking technologies. Camille Goudeseune Jonathan Follett, Editor Foreword by Saul Kaplan Designing for Emerging Technologies UX for Genomics, Robotics, and the Internet of Things Edited by Jonathan Follett · · · · · Beijing   Cambridge   Farnham   Köln   Sebastopol   Tokyo Designing for Emerging Technologies Edited by Jonathan Follett Copyright © 2015 Jonathan Follett. All rights reserved. Printed in the United States of America. Published by O’Reilly Media, Inc., 1005 Gravenstein Highway North, Sebastopol, CA 95472. O’Reilly books may be purchased for educational, business, or sales promotional use. Online editions are also available for most titles (safaribooksonline.com). For more information, contact our corporate/ institutional sales department: (800) 998-9938 or [email protected] Editors: Jonathan Follett, Mary Treseler, and Angela Rufino Production Editor: Kara Ebrahim Copyeditor: Dianne Russell Proofreader: Charles Roumeliotis Indexer: Ginny Munroe Cover Designer: Ellie Volckhausen Interior Designers: Ron Bilodeau and Monica Kamsvaag Illustrator: Rebecca Demarest Compositor: Kara Ebrahim November 2014: First Edition. Revision History for the First Edition: 2014-10-30 First release 2015-05-08 Second release See for release details. The O’Reilly logo is a registered trademark of O’Reilly Media, Inc. Designing for Emerging Technologies, the cover image, and related trade dress are trademarks of O’Reilly Media, Inc. While the publisher and the authors have used good faith efforts to ensure that the information and instructions contained in this work are accurate, the publisher and the authors disclaim all responsibility for errors or omissions, including without limitation responsibility for damages resulting from the use of or reliance on this work. Use of the information and instructions contained in this work is at your own risk. If any code samples or other technology this work contains or describes is subject to open source licenses or the intellectual property rights of others, it is your responsibility to ensure that your use thereof complies with such licenses and/or rights. ISBN: 978-1-4493-7051-0 [LSI] [ List of Contributors ] Chapter 1: Designing for Emerging Technologies Jonathan Follett, Principal—Involution Studios Chapter 2: Intelligent Materials: Designing Material Behavior Brook Kennedy, Associate Professor, Industrial Design—Virginia Tech Chapter 3: Taking Control of Gesture Interaction Gershom Kutliroff, Principal Engineer—Intel Yaron Yanai, Creative Director—Omek Studio at Intel Chapter 4: Fashion with Function: Designing for Wearables Michal Levin, Senior User Experience Designer—Google Chapter 5: Learning and Thinking with Things Stephen P. Anderson, Independent Consultant—PoetPainter, LLC Chapter 6: Designing for Collaborative Robotics Jeff Faneuff, Director of Engineering—Carbonite iii Chapter 7: Design Takes on New Dimensions: Evolving Visualization Approaches for Neuroscience and Cosmology Hunter Whitney, UX Designer and Principal—Hunter Whitney and Associates, Inc. Chapter 8: Embeddables: The Next Evolution of Wearable Tech Andy Goodman, President—Fjord US Chapter 9: Prototyping Interactive Objects Scott Sullivan, Experience Designer—Adaptive Path Chapter 10: Emerging Technology and Toy Design Barry Kudrowitz, Assistant Professor and Director of Product Design— University of Minnesota Chapter 11: Musical Instrument Design Camille Goudeseune, Computer Systems Analyst—Beckman Institute, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Chapter 12: Design for Life Juhan Sonin, Creative Director—Involution Studios Chapter 13: Architecture as Interface: Advocating a Hybrid Design Approach for Interconnected Environments Erin Rae Hoffer, Industry Strategist—Autodesk Chapter 14: Design for the Networked World: A Practice for the TwentyFirst Century Matt Nish-Lapidus, Partner and Design Director—Normative iv  |   List of Contributors Chapter 15: New Responsibilities of the Design Discipline: A Critical Counterweight to the Coming Technologies? Martin Charlier, Independent Design Consultant Chapter 16: Designing Human-Robot Relationships Scott Stropkay, Cofounder and Partner—Essential Design Bill Hartman, Director of Research—Essential Design Chapter 17: Tales from the Crick: Experiences and Services When Design Fiction Meets Synthetic Biology Marco Righetto, Interaction and Service Designer—SumAll Andy Goodman, President—Fjord US Chapter 18: Beyond 3D Printing: The New Dimensions of Additive Fabrication Steven Keating, Mechanical Engineering Doctoral Candidate—MIT Media Lab, Mediated Matter Group Chapter 19: Become an Expert at Becoming an Expert Lisa deBettencourt, Director of Product Design—Imprivata Chapter 20: The Changing Role of Design Dirk Knemeyer, Founder—Involution Studios | List of Contributors      v [ Contents ] Foreword . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xv Chapter 1 Designing for Emerging Technologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 by Jonathan Follett A Call to Arms. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Design for Disruption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Eight Design Tenets for Emerging Technology. . . . . . . . . . 8 Changing Design and Designing Change. . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Chapter 2 Intelligent Materials: Designing Material Behavior . . . 27 by Brook Kennedy Bits and Atoms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Emerging Frontiers in Additive Manufacturing. . . . . . . 32 Micro Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Dynamic Structures and Programmable Matter . . . . . . 34 Connecting the Dots: What Does Intelligent Matter Mean for Designers?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Conclusion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Chapter 3 Taking Control of Gesture Interaction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 by Gershom Kutliroff and Yaron Yanai Reinventing the User Experience. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Analysis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Prototyping. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 A Case Study: Gesture Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Trade-offs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Looking Ahead . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 vii Chapter 4 Fashion with Function: Designing for Wearables. . . . . . 65 by Michal Levin The Next Big Wave in Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 The Wearables Market Segments. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Wearables Are Not Alone. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 UX (and Human) Factors to Consider. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Summary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Chapter 5 Learning and Thinking with Things . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 by Stephen P. Anderson Tangible Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 (Near) Future Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 Timeless Design Principles?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .130 Farther Out, a Malleable Future. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136 Nothing New Under the Sun. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 Closing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138 Chapter 6 Designing for Collaborative Robotics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139 by Jeff Faneuff Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139 Designing Safety Systems for Robots. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143 Humanlike Robots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154 Human-Robot Collaboration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158 Testing Designs by Using Robotics Platforms. . . . . . . . 165 Future Challenges for Robots Helping People . . . . . . . 172 Conclusion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174 Robotics Resources. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175 Chapter 7 Design Takes on New Dimensions: Evolving Visualization Approaches for Neuroscience and Cosmology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177 by Hunter Whitney The Brain Is Wider Than the Sky . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177 Section 1: An Expanding Palette for Visualization . . . 179 Section 2: Visualizing Scientific Models (Some Assembly Required) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188 viii  |   CONTENTS Section 3: Evolving Tools, Processes, and Interactions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194 Conclusion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202 Chapter 8 Embeddables: The Next Evolution of Wearable Tech . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205 by Andy Goodman Technology That Gets Under Your Skin. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205 Permeable Beings: The History of Body Modification. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208 Decoration, Meaning, and Communication. . . . . . . . . . 209 Optimization and Repair. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213 The Extended Human. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216 Just Science Fiction, Right?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224 Key Questions to Consider . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224 Chapter 9 Prototyping Interactive Objects. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 225 by Scott Sullivan Misconceptions Surrounding Designers Learning to Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226 Chapter 10 Emerging Technology and Toy Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237 by Barry Kudrowitz The Challenge of Toy Design. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237 Toys and the S-Curve. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239 Toys and Intellectual Property. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241 Emerging Technologies in Toy Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242 Inherently Playful Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247 Sensors and Toy Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248 Emerging Technology in Production and Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250 Summary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253 Chapter 11 Musical Instrument Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255 by Camille Goudeseune Experience Design and Musical Instruments. . . . . . . . 255 The Evolution of the Musician. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 258 Conclusion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 272 | CONTENTS      ix Chapter 12 Design for Life. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 273 by Juhan Sonin Bloodletting to Bloodless. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 273 The Surveillance Invasion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 278 Life First—Health a Distant Second. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 281 Stage Zero Detection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 284 From Protein to Pixel to Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 286 Final Thoughts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 287 Chapter 13 Architecture as Interface: Advocating a Hybrid Design Approach for Interconnected Environments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 289 by Erin Rae Hoffer The Blur of Interconnected Environments . . . . . . . . . . . 289 Theorizing Digital Culture: New Models of Convergence. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 292 Hybrid Design Practice. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 295 Changing Definitions of Space. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300 A Framework for Interconnected Environments . . . . . 301 Spheres of Inquiry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303 An Exercise in Hybrid Design Practice. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 305 Architecture as Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 307 Conclusion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 309 References. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310 Chapter 14 Design for the Networked World: A Practice for the Twenty-First Century . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 313 by Matt Nish-Lapidus The Future of Design. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 313 New Environment, New Materials. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 316 New Tools for a New Craft. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 325 x  |   CONTENTS Chapter 15 New Responsibilities of the Design Discipline: A Critical Counterweight to the Coming Technologies?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 331 by Martin Charlier Critiquing Emerging Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 331 Emerging Technologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 333 New Responsibilities of the Design Discipline. . . . . . . 343 Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 345 Chapter 16 Designing Human-Robot Relationships. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 347 by Scott Stropkay and Bill Hartman Me Man, You Robot: Designers Creating Powerful Tools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 348 Me Man, You Robot? Developing Emotional Relationships with Robots. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 354 Me Robot? On Becoming Robotic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 358 Into the Future . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 360 Your Robot: Consider Nielsen, Maslow, and Aristotle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 361 Conclusion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 364 Chapter 17 Tales from the Crick: Experiences and Services When Design Fiction Meets Synthetic Biology . . . . . . . 365 by Marco Righetto and Andy Goodman Design Fictions as a Speculative Tool to Widen the Understanding of Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 365 The Building Bricks of the Debate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 366 Healthcare Narratives: From Scenarios to Societal Debates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 373 Living Objects: Symbiotic Indispensable Companions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 376 Chapter 18 Beyond 3D Printing: The New Dimensions of Additive Fabrication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 379 by Steven Keating MIT and the Mediated Matter Group: Previous and Current Additive Fabrication Research . . . . . . . . . . 379 The Dimensions of Additive Fabrication . . . . . . . . . . . . . 380 Conclusion. ...
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