Political Socialization Paper.docx - Surname 1 Name Course...

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Surname 1 Name Course Instructor Date The American Electoral College I have always been interested in the American Elections System, having heard of it from the news, even from China. However, I only got to experience it recently, something that made me take interest in learning more about the Electoral College specifically. The manner in which the United States elects its President is different from how other republic democracies. In a country like China, the National People’s Congress, the Chinese national legislature that is made up of legislators. Unlike this, voters elect their Presidents in the majority of republic democracies around the world, which leaves China and the United States almost similar in terms of the President not being actually put into office by the voters. What stands out about the United States’ Presidential Elections, however, is that the President is elected by the Electoral College. In the United States, the people do not pick their President by direct ballot. Technically, they only select electors. These electors then form the Electoral College, which is the body that officially elects the American President. Figuring out what its relevance is to American elections and to voters, discussing its pros and also its cons helps understand whether there was any controversy with the 2016 Presidential elections in the United States, specifically how the President did not win the majority vote yet he was elected by the Electoral College eventually. The Electoral College, therefore, is the body of electors who vote for the American President, and, therefore, the President’s running mate, who becomes the Vice President (Houser, 2018). The Electoral College consists of electors who vote for the president. Initially, each
Surname 2 elector used to vote for two persons (Bugh, 128). The one who ended up with the greatest number of votes, which also saw him have a majority, was the one who became President while the one who ended up with the second most votes became the vice president. Historians point out that in the case there was none among them who got the majority votes, the elections went to the house and in the house, and each state had one vote. The Senate would then vote and elect the vice president. However, the ratification of the 12 th Amendment to the US Constitution ended this electoral system in 1804 (Nelson). It was changed into a system that now cast separate votes for the president as well as the vice president rather than having two votes for the president.

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