habsburg-syllabi-dance-or-not-dance-stalin-eastern-europe-under-communism-1944-1989.pdf - Dancing(or not with Stalin Eastern Europe under Communism

Habsburg-syllabi-dance-or-not-dance-stalin-eastern-europe-under-communism-1944-1989.pdf

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Dancing (or not) with Stalin: Eastern Europe under Communism, 1945-1989 EEundercommunismsyllabus.htm[26.06.17, 16:36:03] To Dance (or not to Dance) with Stalin: Eastern Europe under Communism, 1944-1989 History D330 spring 2003-2004 Professor Marci Shore office hours Thursdays 9-11, BH 833 855-8036; [email protected] grader Deanna Wooley; [email protected] office hours Tuesdays 1-2, main lobby of library This is the follow-up lecture course to D300 (“The Trouble with Being Born”: Eastern Europe in the First Half of the Twentieth Century). The course begins inside the Second World War, when the interwar years have decisively come to an end, but no one yet knows what is to follow. We will then explore the history of Eastern Europe from the “liminal” years immediately following the end of the war, through the Stalinist period, the post-Stalin “Thaw,” the emergence of “revisionist” Marxism, “normalization” and dissent, and finally the revolutions of 1989. Within this narrative, topics will include the bloody Stalinist show trials, the Tito-Stalin split, the failed Hungarian Revolution of 1956, the Prague Spring of 1968, the reign of Ceaucescu in Romania, and the flowering of samizdat and dissident culture in the 1970s and 1980s. D300 is not a prerequisite for this class. the following readings can be purchased at TIS or the IU Bookstore: Rothschild, Return to Diversity Gale Stokes, From Stalinism to Pluralism Milan Kundera, The Joke Heda Margolius Kovaly, Under a Cruel Star Other course readings will be available via e-reserve and can be accessed through IUCAT. Click on reserves, type the instructor’s name, or course number, and click on the instructor or course. In the index provided, click on the course number followed by electronic reserves and give the password “grateful.” course requirements: Students are expected to attend all lectures and complete all reading assignments. Attendance will not, however, be taken at lectures. Anyone who misses one or more lectures should get the notes from someone else in the class. Forming study groups for the midterm and final is voluntary, of course, and strongly encouraged. Exam questions will be based on material from both the readings and the lectures. Make-up exams will only be permitted with a documented medical excuse. Please turn in your assignments on time; five points will be deducted from your grade for every day an assignment is late. Journal responses to the reading should include be typed and should include dated comments on each reading assignment (excluding the textbook by Rothschild and Wingfield). These entries are not full-blown traditional essays with an introduction, thesis statement, etc., but rather should be understanding as a space for brainstorming ideas and thoughts provoked by the reading. The point is not to be refined and conclusive, but rather to think creatively and to generate the kinds of analytical and critical ideas that could potentially form the basis for a more substantive paper. You should think about the different kinds of sources historians use, what the problems are with these sources. What do they reveal and what do they obscure? What do they reveal about the author? How do you feel
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