class_16_17.doc - Classes 16 and 17 Learning Objectives Understand resource aspects of workflows Be able to model resource aspects in YAWL Readings This

class_16_17.doc - Classes 16 and 17 Learning Objectives...

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Classes 16 and 17Learning ObjectivesUnderstand resource aspects of workflowsBe able to model resource aspects in YAWLReadingsThis class is the third in a series of classes (14 to 19) which will introduce you to the control-flow,resource, and data-flow perspective of a workflow model. The previous classes covered the control-flow, that is concerned with defining the tasks that make up a workflow, and the order in which they areto be executed. In this class, we will define the resource perspectives for workflows.Resources are typically people in the organization and the roles they play. The resource perspective isconcerned with who is allowed to or who is supposed to carry out the tasks in a workflow. As the previous classes, this class also relies on Chapters 2, 3, 8, and 10 of the textbook. We will try toguide your reading to focus on the resource perspective, but you will likely end up reading somematerial multiple times, as it is hard to really separate the control-flow, resource, and data perspectives.For this class, we will read some additional sections in Chapters 2 and 8 but also include parts ofChapter 10.Once you have an understanding of the different resource patterns and the routing and interactionstrategies supported by YAWL (Chapter 2), you will need to know how to actually use the YAWLsoftware to implement them. This happens in two parts. In the YAWL control center web application,you can log into the YAWL resource service to define the organizational structure, i.e. the roles,positions, users, etc (Chapter 10). Once all this is defined, you can then assign resources to tasks in theYAWL editor (Chapter 8). Finally, you will learn to execute a workflow and observe it in action.This class is heavily hands-on with the YAWL software.As for the previous classes, the YAWL usersmanual (installed on your computer with the software) might also be helpful for the detail. If you wishto read the user's manual, the relevant sections in there are 6.3.4, 6.3.5, 6.3.6, and 6.4.You may also wish to have a look at the following tutorial videos on the course web-site:Video Y2: YAWL Control Center – Resource DefinitionsVideo Y5: YAWL – Resource Allocation DemoVideo Y6: YAWL – Process Execution DemoChapter 2Chapter 2 is the core chapter of the textbook (and of the entire course) and you should read it carefullyand understand it thoroughly. For this class, you should read the following sections that deal withresourcing and resource patterns:Section 2.1Section 2.2.3Section 2.6 (withoutFigure 2.33 and 2.35)
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Resources in the workflow context almost always means human resources. In fact, the two mostimportant purposes of a workflow system is the routing of work items and interaction with theworkflow users to make work items available (work items are instancesof a task, e.g. task “Approvepurchase order” is executed for purchase order 101, for purchase order 102, etc.). Section 2.2.3introduces you to 7 different types resource patterns that the YAWL authors have observed in realworkflows. While section 2.2.3 may be a little abstract and difficult to understand because it has no
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