Laura's PICOT Statement with Research Critiques.docx -...

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Running head: PICOT STATEMENT WITH RESEARCH CRITIQUES1PICOT Statement with Research CritiquesLaura N. KeltyGrand Canyon University: NRS-433VJuly 21, 2019
PICOT STATEMENT WITH RESEARCH CRITIQUES2Healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) are a serious healthcare problem that is very prevalent today. A healthcare-associated infection is an infection that a patient has developed within at least 48-72 hours as a result of being in a healthcare facility and receiving medical treatment, and these infections are often preventable by healthcare professionals. Healthcare-associated infections are a Healthy People 2020 topic with a goal of prevention, reduction, and elimination. HAIs are a direct result from procedures, surgery, central line associated bloodstream infections, urinary catheter associated infections, surgical site infection, ventilators, Methicillin- resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and pneumonia, which can all be life threatening. HAIs are a pressing healthcare problem because it is a huge patient safety concern asthey are a major cause of patient morbidity and mortality in the United States.In 2011, an estimated 648,000 patients experienced 721,800 HAIs in United States acute care hospitals (Huang, Chen, Wang, & He, 2016). Recent studies suggest that implementing existing prevention practices such as prevention bundles and chlorhexidine bathing can lead to up to a 70 percent reduction in certain HAIs with a financial benefit estimated to be $25 billion to $31.5 billion in medical cost savings (Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion [ODPHP], 2019). Research concerning CHG bathing intervention was evaluated and found to decrease HAIs, and reduction was greater than compared to bathing with soap and water (Rubin, Louthan, Wessels, Downer, & Maiden, 2013). As we know interventions only work with education and compliance. Education about CHG bathing, proper application, and compliance are key to preventing HAIs and it starts with staff knowledge. This paper will present my PICOT question, my research critiques of two qualitative and quantitative articles related to PICOT question, and the proposed evidence-based practice change.
PICOT STATEMENT WITH RESEARCH CRITIQUES3PICOT StatementDo adult patients across inpatient units (P), who bathe daily with chlorhexidine gluconate(I) compared to not bathing (C) reduce the rate of healthcare associated infections (HAIs) (O) during their hospital stay (T)?Research CritiquesQualitative StudiesBackground of the study. Healthcare-associated infections pose detrimental morbidity and mortality rates in the hospital setting, and place massive financial burdens for many institutions. In the United States every year approximately 722,000 people acquire and 75,000 people pass away from a hospital-acquired infection (HAI) which costs the healthcare system $9.8 billion yearly (Musuuza, Roberts, Carayon, & Safdar, 2017). A rationale behind research studies show that EBP practices such as CHG daily bathing practices aid in reducing HAIs including central line associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs). Research shows that nurses

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