K_PublicPrivate.docx - Strake CS and JD Private Sphere NC 1 Part One-Links A Although the affirmative sympathizes with the victim\u2019s plight in

K_PublicPrivate.docx - Strake CS and JD Private Sphere NC 1...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 7 pages.

Strake CS and JD Private Sphere NC 1 Part One-Links A. Although the affirmative sympathizes with the victim’s plight, in narrowing the debate to how victims can overcome the oppression of intimate relationship violence they construct domestic violence as a private problem, and ignore the social and cultural problems that lie at the root of spousal aggression. Berns 1 : “ A n individual frame of responsibility focus[es] primarily on the victim. A prevalent question in these articles is "Why do battered women remain in the abusive relationship? " In these articles, the victim may not always be blamed explicitly for the violence or for staying in the relationship. Indeed, many articles focus on the victim in a sympathetic manner, such as by giving her credit for leaving the abusive relation- ship, changing her behavior, or seeking counseling. However, the focus- and thus the responsibility-remains on the victim rather than the batterer. Explanations for why women stay in abusive relationships often mention institutional and social barriers; however, these perspectives still place responsibility on the individual rather than on society or specific institutions . There is no advice on how society can change to help the victim. Rather, the victim must overcome these obstacles.” [Specific AC Links to how victim can overcome DV] B. Describing the victimization of one human being by their intimate partner as “domestic violence” entrenches the notion that intimate relationship violence is a private matter restricted to the confines of the household or family unit. Holmes 2 explains: “ A central tenet of the dominant Western feminist discourse about violence against women is that intimate relationship violence is hidden through the construct of privacy of the domestic spher e of the heterosexual home. The term ‘domestic violence’ (although not universally applied) also conveys the idea that intimate relationship violence occurs in private in the home.” [Additional AC Links to definition of DV] C. The affirmative strategy of pigeonholing the resolutional conflict to the actions of a discrete and singular victim and a similarly atomic abuser engenders a discussion of domestic violence devoid of social context or reference to the institutions and cultural practices that define and reproduce that violence. [Specific AC Links to AC’s conception of ethical subject/victim] Part Two-Impacts 1 Berns, Nancy. “My Problem and How I solved It”: Domestic Violence in Women’s Magazines.” 1999. 2 Holmes, Cindy. “Destabilizing homonormativity and the public/private dichotomy in North American lesbian domestic violence discourses.” 2009.
Image of page 1
Strake CS and JD Private Sphere NC 2 A. The affirmative’s portrayal of domestic violence as a private matter shrouds the real problem at stake. An authentic reckoning with the ethical conflict over victims who kill must start with the recognition that domestic violence is rooted in the deep-structures of heteronormative male dominance that characterize many social norms. Randall
Image of page 2
Image of page 3

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 7 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture