Frankenstein (English 10H) - Sabine Salnave English 10H Vachris Frankenstein by Mary Shelley Journal Entries The beginning of Frankenstein is told The

Frankenstein (English 10H) - Sabine Salnave English 10H...

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Sabine Salnave8/31/17English 10HVachrisFrankensteinby Mary Shelley: Journal EntriesThe beginning of Frankensteinis toldthrough several letters from the character Robert Walton to his sister Margaret, a format known as the epistolary method.The use of letters in the beginning of the novel helps the narrative, because it is a clever way to introduce the setting, and a few character traits while remaining within the bounds of a frame tale. On the surface, Walton is telling his sister about his whereabouts and what he wants to accomplish, but in reality, Shelley is describing where the story takes place and introducing Frankenstein in a way that seems natural to the reader. “No one can conceive the variety of feelings which bore me onwards, likea hurricane, in the first enthusiasm of success. Life and death appeared to me ideal bounds, which I should first break through, and pour a torrent of light into our dark world. A new species would bless me as its creator and source; many happy and excellent natures would owe their being to me. No father could claim This quote reveals an important character trait of Frankenstein’s: his hubris, or excessive pride. As described in the excerpt, Frankenstein was excited about the potential for the creation of a new species, and he was motivated to continue his work by the idea of becoming the “god” to a new race of people. These motivations were extremely selfish. In his fit of “enthusiastic madness”, he neglects to consider how this new species could affect the world. His desire to reach the status of a god, as well as his desire to achieve greatness in the realm of science both lead to a
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the gratitude of his child so completely as I should deserve theirs.” Chapter 4series of events that couldn’t have been foreseen. However, a moment of rational thought would have been enough to cease the creation of what would become a freak of nature. This is a concept that suggests a theme of being careful what you wish for, since what Frankenstein thought would become the greatest scientific achievement in the history of mankind ended up as his biggest folly.“If the study to which you apply yourself has a tendency to weaken your affections and to destroy your taste for those simple pleasures in which no alloy can possibly mix, thenthat study is certainly unlawful...If this rule were always observed...Greece had not been enslaved, Caesar would have spared his country, America would have been discovered more gradually, and the empires of Mexico and Peru had not been destroyed.” Chapter 4In this quote, Frankenstein notes that human obsessions/ passions throughout history have led to quite a few disastrous events. The fact that Frankenstein seems to be engrossed in his work in a manner akin to the events in this statement foreshadows that the results of his work will yield something just as horrendous as what is described.
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