WVC PHYS222 Winter 2019 Lab 3.docx - Archimedes Principle Max Stevens Luke Corbin ABSTRACT The purpose of this lab was to find if objects would sink or

WVC PHYS222 Winter 2019 Lab 3.docx - Archimedes Principle...

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Archimedes Principle Max Stevens Luke Corbin 1/23/2019 ABSTRACT: The purpose of this lab was to find if objects would sink or float in a fluid with known density using the Archimedes Principle, be able to tell the difference between density and specific gravity, and be able to describe how the densities of objects could be determined experimentally. The anticipated outcome is that the denser the fluid, the easier it is for an object to float in that fluid. Also the denser the object, the harder it is for it to float in a liquid. INTRODUCTION: Archimedes lived in the 200s BC. “He is most famous for discovering the law of hydrostatics, sometimes known as 'Archimedes' principle', stating that a body immersed in fluid loses weight equal to the weight of the amount of fluid it displaces” (BBC history). Using this idea we can determine the weight of an unknown object in a fluid, the volume of an object in a known fluid, or the density of a fluid with other variables known. THEORY: The density of an object can be expressed using the equation: ρ = m v Eq. 1 The buoyant force is the upwards force that causes the mass of an object submerged in a fluid to appear to have less mass. This can be expressed by the equation: F b =( m 0 m 0 ' ) g Eq. 2 Source: Lab Book
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Where F b is the buoyant force and m 0 is the mass of the object in air and m’ 0 is the mass of the object when submerged in a fluid. Specific gravity is the ratio of the weight of a substance to the weight of an equal volume of water. Since the buoyant force is equal to the weight of the water displaced, specific gravity is also the ratio between the weight of a substance to the buoyant force. Since buoyant force is equal to the weight of an object in air and the apparent mass of the object in water specific gravity can be defined as: sp .gr . = w 0 w 0 w 0 ' = m 0 m 0 m 0 ' Eq. 3 Source: Lab Book Since the density of water in SI units is 1 g/cm 3 , specific gravity is equal to density in g/cm 3 . The density of a buoyant object can be found as well by attaching a sinker and taking two weight measurements, one with only the sinker submerged (w 1 ), and another with both submerged (w 2 ). This results in the equation: w 1 w 2 =( w 0 + w s ' )−( w 0 ' + w s ' )= w 0 w 0 ' Eq. 4 Source: Lab Book Then this can be substituted into Eq. 3 to yield: sp .gr . = w 0 w 1 w 2 Eq. 5 Source: Lab Book Specific gravity can also be used to find the density of a liquid given the density and mass of a solid in air and in water. This can be done by defining specific gravity as a ratio of densities, and making it a ratio of the density of the solid to the density of the fluid: This can be set equal to Eq.3: sp .gr . = w 0 w 0 w 0 ' = m 0 m 0
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  • Bruce Unger
  • Buoyancy, Buoyant Force

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