WVC PHYS222 Winter 2019 Lab #5.docx - Hooke’s Law and Simple Harmonic Motion Max Stevens Luke Corbin ABSTRACT The purpose of this lab was to

WVC PHYS222 Winter 2019 Lab #5.docx - Hooke’s Law and...

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Hooke’s Law and Simple Harmonic Motion Max Stevens Luke Corbin 2/6/2019 ABSTRACT: The purpose of this lab was to demonstrate restoring force and show real world examples of hooke's law and what happens as weights undergo simple harmonic motion while attached to a spring. INTRODUCTION: “Hooke’s law, law of elasticity discovered by the English scientist Robert Hooke in 1660, which states that, for relatively small deformations of an object, the displacement or size of the deformation is directly proportional to the deforming force or load” (britannica). An object that is being stretched or contracted following Hooke’s law undergoes simple harmonic motion. Simple harmonic motion describes a cyclical pattern of motion for an object. THEORY: Hooke's law is as follows: F =− k Δ x Where F is the force being exerted on the object, x is the distance the object has stretched, and k is the spring constant of the object. The negative sign is in the equation because the displacement and the force are in the opposite direction. In this lab, the force is the force exerted to stretch the object, which is equal to the force of the spring since the system will be observed when it is at equilibrium. Therefore the force and displacement are in the same direction. So the equation that will be used for calculations in this lab are as follows: F = k Δ x
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This equation can be expressed to find k from force and displacement: k = F Δ x If multiple forces and displacements are found, then points can be plotted with force on the y- axis and displacement on the x-axis, and the slope of the line of best fit would be the spring constant of the spring, since slope = rise run , and force is the rise and displacement is the run. For an object in oscillation, the period can be expressed using: T = 2 π Where T is the period of oscillation, m is the mass on the oscillating object, and k is the spring constant of the oscillating object. This equation can be expressed to find k from mass and period: k = 4 π 2 ( T 2 m ) Eq. 5 If multiple masses and periods are found, the points can be plotted with mass on the x-axis and period squared on the y-axis, and the slope of the line of best fit can be substituted for T 2 m , and k can be found. EXPERIMENT: The materials needed for this experiment were as follows; 2 plastic springs, a brass spring, a weight set with hangers, micrometer and rulers, and lastly a tall stand to hang the springs from. The first step was measuring the size of the springs and rubber band using the
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  • Fall '18
  • Bruce Unger
  • Mass, Robert Hooke

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