LectureOutline6-socioemoinf[1]

LectureOutline6-socioemoinf[1] - Lecture Outline Lecture 6...

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Lecture Outline – Lecture 6 – Emotional and Social Development in Infancy Understanding Infant and Toddler Personality: Psychodynamic Theories Birth to 1 Year Freud’s approach – encouraged us to look at early emotional and social interactions. Oral Stage – amount of food, satisfaction with quantity shapes personality. Erikson’s approach – quality of mother’s behavior during feeding and general care giving. Psychosocial conflict: Trust vs. mistrust. Sees trust as the foundation of human development. Positive resolution would come out of the care giving if the balance of care giving is sympathetic and loving. Mistrustful baby cannot count on others – protects themselves by withdrawing. Can affect development because much of what we learn comes from other people. Quality care giving - sensitive, responsive, consistent. Years 1 to 3 – Toddler period. Freud’s approach Anal Stage – toilet training, need to control impulses. Erikson’s approach – Psychosocial conflict: autonomy vs. shame and doubt. How parents handle the self assertions and independence of their toddler. For a positive resolution, need suitable guidance and reasonable free choice. Do not force or shame the child. Tolerance and understanding. Negative resolution – child feels shames and doubts ability. Emotional Development during the First Two Years Emotional communication as first language – infants react to tones of voice. Can become very good at detecting and reading emotion.
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