Discussion 4 - Charlemagne

Discussion 4 - Charlemagne - Ryan Lee HIST 151...

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Ryan Lee HIST 151 Bullard/Vierra October 4, 2007 The office of the Mayor of the Palace was position in which one had the real power and authority. The title of “King” yielded the power one would expect it to have to the Mayor of the Palace, and the King ended up being much more of an image for the people than a real man of ultimate authority. The Mayor of the Palace was in charge of the government and made the decisions that one would expect a king would make. Charlemagne’s father obtained Mayor of the Palace from his father, Pepin, who had received the position from his father, Charles Martel. The Roman Pontiff promoted Pepin from Mayor of the Palace to the office of King. He then ruled the Franks alone for fifteen years, meaning the office of the Mayor of the Palace was no longer the position of authority over the King. Charlemagne, who at the time was called Charles, was elected a dual king with Carloman by a general assembly, but after this proved unsuccessful and difficult to maintain, Charles was eventually elected sole King of the Franks. Einhard places a good deal of emphasis on education in his biography of
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This note was uploaded on 04/01/2008 for the course HIST 151 taught by Professor Hunziker during the Spring '07 term at UNC.

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Discussion 4 - Charlemagne - Ryan Lee HIST 151...

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