Order ID 2350888.doc - Running head SOCIAL CONSTRUCTION OF...

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Running head: SOCIAL CONSTRUCTION OF RACE IN THE U.S. 1 Social Biological Construction of Race in The United States (Author’s name) (Institutional Affiliation)
SOCIAL CONSTRUCTION OF RACE IN THE U.S. 2 Social Biological Construction of Race in The United States According to Frankenberg, the daily lives of individuals are affected by race in one way or another (1994). People perceive the world via a racial lens that makes them color it white, black, Mexican, Asian, minority and Hispanic among others. Arguably, the way people see each other greatly affects numerous domains of their lives more so in terms of the amount of wealth they generate, the foods they consume, the jobs they do, the friends they make and even the schools they attend among others. Many at times, people are made to believe that they are not living in a post-racial society with valued historical linkages. In fact, more often, people tend to ignore the topic of race whenever it is brought up for discussion. They struggle to differentiate African Americans from European Americans, Latinos, and Latinas, Asian Americans, Native Americans and so on. In this respect, this paper seeks to discuss the social and biological construction of race in the United States (U.S.), by using historical events as the principal basis of its argument. Essentially, the concept of race in the U.S. has for a long time been presented as both individual and social. Indeed, race has been socially established within several contexts such as political, economic, socio-political, cultural and legal among others. As such, arguably, these factors are most likely the effect as opposed to the main causes of race-related concerns that today's society experiences. Since the early 17th Century, to the late 19th Century, state laws had the authority of determining an individual's race, pertaining who was White or Black. Ironically, one could be considered a Black in one state, and upon crossing the boundary to another state, they could no longer be considered Black.

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