SY101 Midterm Review - Chapter 1 Sociological Imagination...

This preview shows page 1 - 5 out of 13 pages.

Chapter 1: Sociological Imagination Sociological Imagination; C. W. Mills: The capacity to think systematically about how things we experience as personal problems those are social issues that are widely shared by others living in a similar times and location as us Unpack the everyday, unsettle assumptions Asking hard questions Stereotypes Difference between “personal troubles” and “public issues” of social structure Social Construction; Peter Berger To uncover the ways in which individuals and groups participate in the creation of their perceived reality Calls into question “normal” Critical citizenship, agency, and democracy Social Contexts: the social environments, including economic and cultural conditions, that influence people’s lives Social, economic and historical contexts we are born to matter E.g. (child's immediate family, neighbourhood, education, job, country) Social Location: personal experience influenced by social location defined by their gender, race, social class, age, ability, religion, sexual orientation, and geographic location. Social Interaction: refers to the way people act together & governed by norms Social Structure: the many diverse ways in which the rules and norms of everyday life become enduring patterns that shape and govern social interactions Lies in the background of every social interaction Norms : basic rules of society that help us know what is and isn’t appropriate to do in any situation
Development of Sociology: 1. Industrialization Enlightenment (philosophers writing on reason and science replacing tradition for human growth and development) 2. Imperialism Colonial empires from Africa to USA (understanding social changes happening in different cities 3. Success of Natural Science Scientific method Institutions : longstanding and important practices (marriages, families, education), as well as organizations that regulate those practices (government) CHAPTER 2: Social Theory ● Systematic ideas about the relationship between individuals and societies → Theories enable us to see things in a different way ➢ They can guide and provoke ➢ They encourage us to ask new questions ➢ They often incite action and critical thinking to come up with new approaches 3 Common themes:
Social Theory changes in the late 19th & Early 20th Centuries: 1. Industrial revolution 2. Rural to cities 3. Democracies, organized as sovereign nation-states 4. Religion in society Changes… Capitalism - increased socialists policies Socialism - increased “market” policies Convergence theory: states that as nations transition from the beginning stages of industrialization to highly industrialized nations, the same societal patterns will emerge, eventually creating a global culture. SOCIAL THEORISTS KARL MARX
Modes of production: characterize the dominant economic system in a society and the classes that the economic system gives rise to: ancient societies, feudalism, capitalism Model of society: Forces of production: the technological and productive capacity of any society at a given point in time

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture