Love Ethics of D.H. Lawrence.docx - \u201cThere is no break in the great adventure in consciousness Throughout the howlingest deluge some few brave souls

Love Ethics of D.H. Lawrence.docx - u201cThere is no break...

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“There is no break in the great adventure in consciousness. Throughout the howlingest deluge, some few brave souls are steering the ark under the rainbow." - D.H. Lawrence David Herbert Lawrence is one of the foremost writers of the twentieth century. He was a prolific writer, who during the twenty years of his literary career tried his hand at different genres of literature. During this creative period, not a year passed without the publication of something important from his pen. He was a versatile genius who could excel in many fields. His novels and short stories are his most important and interesting work. He was a good poet and a gifted writer of descriptive and expository essays. Lawrence was one of the greatest English letter writers and his letters rank with those of John Keats and Gerald Manly Hopkins. Many of his contemporaries like Bennett, Wells, Galsworthy, Kipling were as celebrated as Lawrence, yet none of them had the impact on their age and ours that Lawrence had and yet continues to weild. Lawrence was not only a great creative genius but was also gifted with a prophetic vision, he wanted to use novel as a vehicle for communicating his vision of life. Thus fiction and doctrine co-exist in almost all his major novels. Often he gets so obsessed with his philosophic ideas that the aesthetic value of his novels is considerably reduced. Eliseo Vivas, in his book The Failure and the Triumph of Art considers Aaron’s Rod , Kangaroo , The Plumed Serpent and Lady Chatterley’s Lover failures because in these novels Lawrence the prophet gets better of Lawrence the artist and these novels are reduced to the level of propaganda literature. And he declares Sons and Lovers , The Rainbow and Women in Love to be the triumphs of art because in them the prophetic vision of the novelist is fully integrated with his creative faculties, and they satisfy the aesthetic sensibility of the reader as they promote his awareness of life. In any case, for just evaluation and appreciation of Lawrence’s works, it is essential to understand some of the leading ideas that are central to his thinking. Lawrence’s special and characteristic gift was an extraordinary sensitiveness to what Wordsworth called “unknown modes of being”. He was always intensely aware of the mystery of the world, and the mystery was always for him a numen, divine. Lawrence could never forget, as most of us almost continuously forget, the dark presence of the otherness that lies beyond the boundaries of man’s conscious mind. This special sensibility was accompanied by a prodigious power of rendering the immediately experienced otherness in terms of literary art. Along with James Joyce, D. H. Lawrence established the opposed boundaries for the novel in the 20 th century. In contrast to Joyce’s detachment in aesthetic patters of myth and symbol, Lawrence is all engagement and exposure, a link with the romantics and the visionary quality of Blake, the sensuousness of Keats, and the defiance of Shelley. Both Lawrence and Joyce are haunted by the

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