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American Academy of Political and Social ScienceThe New Second Generation: Segmented Assimilation and Its VariantsAuthor(s): Alejandro Portes and Min ZhouSource: The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science,Vol. 530,Interminority Affairs in the U. S.: Pluralism at the Crossroads (Nov., 1993), pp. 74-96Published by: Sage Publications, Inc. in association with the American Academy ofPolitical and Social ScienceStable URL: Accessed: 11-09-2017 21:29 UTCJSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a widerange of content in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity andfacilitate new forms of scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact [email protected]Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of the Terms & Conditions of Use, available atSage Publications, Inc., American Academy of Political and Social Sciencearecollaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access to The Annals of theAmerican Academy of Political and Social ScienceThis content downloaded from 128.228.0.60 on Mon, 11 Sep 2017 21:29:22 UTCAll use subject to
ANNALS, AAPSS, 530, November 1993The New Second Generation:Segmented Assimilation and Its VariantsBy ALEJANDRO PORTES and MIN ZHOUABSTRACT: Post-1965 immigration to the United States has givenrise to a vigorous literature focused on adult newcomers. There however, a growing new second generation whose prospects of adaptation cannot be gleaned from the experience of their parents or frothat of children of European immigrants arriving at the turn of thcentury. We present data on the contemporary second generation anreview the challenges that it confronts in seeking adaptation American society. The concept of segmented assimilation is intrduced to describe the diverse possible outcomes of this process adaptation. The concept of modes of incorporation is used for developing a typology of vulnerability and resources affecting such out-comes. Empirical case studies illustrate the theory and highlighconsequences of the different contextual situations facing todaysecond generation.Alejandro Portes is John Dewey Professor of Sociology and International Reat the Johns Hopkins University. He is coauthor, with Rubin G. Rumbaut, of grant America: A Portrait (1990) and, with Alex Stepick, of City on the Edge:Transformation of Miami (1993).Min Zhou is assistant professor of sociology at Louisiana State University. Sthe author of Chinatown: The Socioeconomic Potential of an Urban Enclave (19NOTE: The data on which this article is partially based were collected by the project Cof Immigrants: The Adaptation Process of the Second Generation, supported by the AndMellon Foundation, the National Science Foundation (grant no. SES-9022555), and the Foundation. The article was written while the senior author was in residence at the RussFoundation, whose support is also gratefully acknowledged. The authors are exclusively r

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