How Can Wolves Change A River lesson.pdf - GOING ON...

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GOING ON “VACATION” TO YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK
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Who Set the Moose Loose? Modified from: Kristi Hannam SUNY-Geneseo 3
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It was the summer of 1993. Paul had just finished his first year of grad school, and was excited to start researching bird communities in riparian habitats of the Grand Teton / Yellowstone ecosystem. (Note: this is just before wolf re-introduction) 4
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A riparian habitat is a terrestrial habitat adjacent to a river or stream
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He started by surveying the biodiversity in riparian habitats so he could understand the biological community the birds live in and the kinds of birds found there. Paul’s primary question for his research was: What aspects of the ecosystem most strongly affect the diversity of bird species found there? 6
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What aspects of the ecosystem do you think Paul will find affect the diversity of bird species found there?
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8
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9 (Remember, no wolves yet)
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Using the following list of species and your knowledge of food webs, create a food web for the riparian area where Paul is working. (Arrows follow the direction of energy flow…) • Moose Mule Deer • Beavers • Songbirds • Grasses • Insects • Willows • Aspen • Rabbits 10
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The food web Paul created looked like this. Compare your food web to Paul’s. Where do coyotes and hawks fit in? Coyotes ? Hawks? Moose Elk Songbirds Willow Trees Insects Mule Deer Aspen Beaver Grasses Rabbits 11
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Moose Insects Hawks Elk Songbirds Willow Trees Mule Deer Aspen Beaver Grasses Rabbits Coyotes 12
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Moose Insects Hawks Elk Songbirds Willow Trees Mule Deer Aspen Beaver Grasses Rabbits Coyotes 13 What is the name of the trophic level of songbirds?
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What other organisms share a trophic level with songbirds? Moose Insects Hawks Elk Songbirds Willow Trees Mule Deer Aspen Beaver Grasses Rabbits Coyotes 14
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Of the five listed, one kind of feeding relationship NOT illustrated in the food web is… A. Carnivory B. Herbivory C. Omnivory D. Cannibalism Moose Insects Hawks Elk Songbirds Willow Trees Mule Deer Aspen Beaver Grasses Rabbits Coyotes 15
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