Lab1.docx - Lab 1 Report: Dhruvi Narielwala 4 January 2019...

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Lab 1 Report:Dhruvi Narielwala4 January 2019ME 330 section 2
Table of ContentsAbstract1. Introduction1.1 Hardness1.2 Brinell scale1.3 Rockwell scale1.4 Compression1.5 Stress -Strain2. Procedure2.1 Equipment and Material2.2 Brinell2.3 Rockwell2.4 Compression Procedure3. Results3.1 Hardness data3.2 Stress- Strain Diagrams3.3 Compressive properties data3.4 Specimen images4. Discussion4.1 Hardness data4.2 Stress-Strain Diagrams5. Conclusion6. Acknowledgements7. References1
Abstract:This lab presents results on hardness and compression tests. The Brinell and Rockwell B and Chardness scales are used to measure 1045 steel and 6061 aluminum. The mean, median andstandard deviation are used to show the Brinell scale characterizes both materials while theRockwell scales have higher accuracies at the cost of only being able to characterize onematerial. Additionally, the compressive properties of cast iron, 1045 steel, 6061 aluminum andPMMA are found. The elastic modulus, yield stress/strain, and fracture stress/strain are found.1045 Steel has the highest elastic modulus. Cast Iron undergoes the least strain while PMMA,which was the only material tested to fracture, had the lowest elastic modulus but highest strain.1.Introduction:1.1 Hardness:Hardness is a measure of durability, defined as the ability to resist plastic—permanent—deformation.1The first standardized test was developed in 1820 by Friedrich Mohs to rankmaterials against each other.2Mohs decided on ten materials that served as benchmarks for hisscale, Table 1. A material was ranked on this scale using the scratch test; it receives the numberof the highest number that it could scratch. The Mohs scale is relative and qualitative by design,and new scales needed to be developed to better quantify hardness. The Brinell and Rockwellscales are commonly used scales, which have replaced the Mohs scale. The Brinell scale wasdeveloped in 1900 by J. A. Brinell.2It encompasses a wide range of hardness values, allowing itto be used as a reference to compare narrower scales at the cost of lower accuracy. The Rockwellscale was developed to account for Brinell’s low accuracy as well as portability. The Rockwellscale is a family of scales that measure the depth of indentation to find the hardness; each isTable 1. Mohs Hardness ScaleTable 2: Rockwell Hardness Scale2
defined by a unique applied force and indenter to classify a range of hardness, listed in Table 2.Additional hardness scales like Vickers or Knoop differ in indenter type and applied force. Theyare mainly used in micro-hardness to characterize spatial variation of hardness.2The type ofhardness test used depends on the application. In combination, the Brinell and Rockwell scalesare capable of describing the hardness between and inside material groups.

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Term
Fall
Professor
Downing
Tags
Strain, Stress, Rockwell, Rockwell scale, brinell hardness

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