ENG_105_syllabus_Summer_2019_online.docx - (1 ENG 105.N1 Research and Composition Summer 2019 Online Instructor John Nardone Office Hours ARC 320 M\/W 11

ENG_105_syllabus_Summer_2019_online.docx - (1 ENG 105.N1...

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(1) ENG 105.N1 - Research and Composition Summer 2019, Online Instructor: John Nardone Office Hours: ARC 320; M/W, 11 – 1:30 E-Mail: [email protected] ; Office Phone: (610) 799 -1717 Course Description: In College English I (ENG 105), students write essays, incorporate and integrate primary and secondary sources into their own writing, and master library skills. Students strive for sound logic, effective use of details, appropriate diction, and correct grammar and mechanics. Students study models of good writing, which include student essays and professionally written essays. Course Objectives: 1. Produce college-level writing, including sustained, argumentative essays and using reason, logic, details, and properly attributed evidence to support claims and explain significance. 2. Implement an effective writing process to discover ideas, refine topics, plan arguments, anticipate and address audience needs, and draft, revise, edit, proofread, and publish their work. 3. Find, evaluate, and use information resources, legally and ethically, to answer questions, deepen understanding, and address problems. 4. Interpret, evaluate, and apply feedback from others Course Content: I. Research Skills A. Library orientation 2. Online Library Skills Assignment 3. Gathering sources 4. Evaluation of sources 5. Documentation of sources 6. MLA formatting 7. Avoiding Plagiarism through direct quotation, paraphrase, and summary 8. Integration of skills and sources to produce a documented paper II. The Writing Process 1. Generating ideas through prewriting, such as brainstorming, clustering, freewriting, journaling, etc. 2. Drafting the essay 3. Revising the essay 4. Applying feedback to the essay 5. Editing and polishing the essay
(2) III. Identifying Audience 1. General Audiences 2. Specific Audiences IV. The Structure of an Essay 1. Parts of an essay: introduction, body, conclusion 2. Developing the thesis 3. Organization techniques and transitions V. Critical Reading 1. Active Reading 2. Evaluating readings 3. Comparing and contrasting readings VI. The Development of Ideas 1. Specifics 2. Critical Thinking VII. Style 1. Clarity: conciseness, syntax, correct grammar, correct punctuation 2. Diction 3. Transitions 4. Sentence Fluency 5. Voice Required Course Materials: Graff, Gerald, et al. They Say / I Say: The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing, With Readings . 4th ed. New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 2018. Print. Bullock, Richard et al. The Little Seagull Handbook. 3 rd ed. New York, NY: W.W. Norton & Company, 2017. Print. The course texts are essential. Students should purchase the current editions of the text to pass the course. Students who cannot demonstrate ownership of course textbooks by Week 2 will not be credited for participation in the course. If the student's circumstance is exceptional, it is the student's responsibility to communicate the challenges to the instructor.

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