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Running head: NURSING AND WORKPLACE VIOLENCE 1 Nursing and Workplace Violence Brandy Garner Capella University BSN-FP4006 Policy, Law, Ethics and Regulations April 2019
NURSING AND WORKPLACE VIOLENCE 2 Nursing and Workplace Violence In recent years the media has been filled with stories of nurses and other healthcare professionals that have been victims of violence while trying to perform their jobs. We can all remember the video of the nurse being manhandled and handcuffed for advocating for her patient and protecting him. Recently the news has reported the death of a Louisianan nurse who died following complications from an injury she suffered after being attacked by a mental health patient. This article will discuss what factors are associated with healthcare violence and what strategies can be used to deter and prevent workplace violence. Contributing Factors for Violence The American Nursing Association (ANA) describes workplace violence as “Workplace violence consists of physically and psychologically damaging actions that occur in the workplace or while on duty” ("ANA Position Statement," 2015, p. 4). Workplace violence is classified into four categories all with their own unique risk factors. The four types of violence as described in the ANA position statement are criminal, customer related, worker-on-worker, and interpersonal ("ANA Position Statement," 2015). Nurses and other front-line healthcare workers are often affected by customer/patient violence the most. The risk factors for and associated with this type of abuse stems from current health conditions that are prevalent in the patient population. This can include mental health disorders, drug/alcohol use, and high stress related injuries and illness (Potera, 2016). OSHA has further described how just the environment in which healthcare services are rendered can aid the risk of violence on healthcare workers. Examples of this can be solitary working with patients and their families, transporting patients, and working environment (Occupational Safety and Health Administration [OSHA], 2016).

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