Astro HW-Nebulae - because we have learned that planetary...

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Eitan Reshef Matt Yablansky Astronomy 120 March 17, 2008 Finding Planetary Nebulae In this class, we have learned various methods of observing objects in place such as: stars, planets, galaxies, and dark matter. Our current objective is to figure out a way to count the planetary nebulae in nearby galaxies. Our team has designed a specific device that utilizes the basic properties of these nebulae in order to observe and document them. We have created a telescope that can take pictures of an extremely wide range of stars. We utilize this telescope by aiming it at a nearby galaxy and presuming to take several pictures of and around that galaxy. Once we have isolated the galaxy that we are observing, we must use the most crucial mechanism of our device—the green filter. This green filter allows us to single out the stars that have emission lines of around 501 nanometers. We know this through observing the electromagnetic spectrum colors. The reason we want to single out stars around this wavelength is
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Unformatted text preview: because we have learned that planetary nebulae have extraordinarily bright oxygen emission lines. These oxygen emission lines have a wavelength of around 501 nanometers, so once we have ruled out any objects that do not share this specific characteristic, we will be a lot closer to our goal. We then have to factor in other specific properties of planetary nebulae that will bring us even further towards our goal. We have learned that planetary nebulae are typically elliptical in shape, while stars are typically circular. We also know that archetypal planetary nebulae are about one light year in diameter, and the density of the ionized gas in the nebulae is higher than that of the surrounding interstellar medium. Taking these attributes into account will help us establish a basic set of requirements for these nebulae and therefore will ultimately create a finalized list of the nebulae in the galaxy. Sources http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/P/planneb.html...
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