NRS 433-Qualitative Study Critique on Central Line Infections.docx

This preview shows page 1 - 4 out of 9 pages.

1Running head: QUALITATIVE STUDY CRITIQUE ON CENTRAL LINE INFECTIONSQualitative Study Critique on Central Line InfectionsCarmen E. WellsGrand Canyon University: NRS-433VOctober 14, 2018
2QUALITATIVE STUDY CRITIQUE ON CENTRAL LINE INFECTIONSQualitative Study Critique on Central Line InfectionsThis assignment reviews and critiques Dr. Joy S, Humphrey’s (2015) qualitative study on improving the knowledge base of registered nurses through educational interventions in order to decrease central line-associated blood stream infections (CLABSIs). The Study addresses the educational interventions through the utilization of the Healthcare and Technology Synergy format (HATS) which focused on three components of knowledge: Patient, Product, and Practice. The premise is that by properly addressing these components through educational interventions, an increase in nurse knowledge can qualitatively improve patient care by reducing CLABSIs (Humphrey, 2015). In addition to educational interventions, the study considered the centers for disease control and prevention’s (CDC) five quality measures which include thoroughhandwashing, appropriate central line site selection, sterile protective skin barriers, utilizing chlorhexidine wipes, and the prompt removal of unnecessary central lines (Humphrey, 2015). Byadhering to these five quality measures CLABSIs have been reduced; however, the researcher contends that more could be done if nurses are empowered with more knowledge regarding CLABSI prevention quality measures, patient infection risk factors, types of product usage and care, and identifying signs and symptoms of infection (Humphrey, 2015).Study BackgroundThe author stated that CLABSIs constitute a big part of hospital acquired infections (HAIs), given the fact that central lines are utilized frequently across hospital patient care settings; particularly, in intensive care units (ICUs). The researcher noted that approximately fivemillion catheters are inserted annually in the United States for antibiotic treatment/TPN administration and that half a million result in CLABSIs (Humphrey, 2015). The author asserted that CLABSIs are notably prevalent in ICUs where most of the lines are inserted, manipulated,
3QUALITATIVE STUDY CRITIQUE ON CENTRAL LINE INFECTIONSand utilized in the treatment of debilitated critically ill patients; predisposing them to high infection risks, increased comorbidities, and mortality (Humphrey, 2015). Ultimately, CLABSIs have a negative impact on patient outcomes and patient care by predisposing patients to secondary nocosomial infections and increasing length of hospital stays and costs [ CITATION Kay14 \l 1033 ]. The author pointed out that a CDC study in 2009 revealed a 25,000 reduction in CLABSIs from 43,000 to 18,000 from 2001-2009 which lowered hospital costs by $414 million over an eight-year period [ CITATION Hum15 \l 1033 ]. From an economic and qualitative perspective this is a huge savings that benefits patients, nurses, hospitals, and government, and it

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture