ENG227 Plato's Apology Essay.docx - Shirley 1 Elisabeth...

This preview shows page 1 - 2 out of 4 pages.

Shirley 1 Elisabeth Shirley ENG 172 Professor Woelfel 4 October 2019 Plato’s Apology and the good life In Plato’s “Apology,” Socrates deems that in order to live a good life, one must understand the duty as humans to go about examining and questioning everything, essentially living as a philosopher, like Socrates himself would have, even if it sounded unappealing in its proposal. Living with this belief in mind meant not worrying about, and even rejecting, the temporary, worldly things, such as money, fame, and glory, which Socrates dismissed completely, that surely would not matter after death if one lived a truly “good” life. Socrates depicts his innocence by claiming everything he does is by the will of the gods, which would certainly be a sound logical argument to the people of Athens, seeing as the government was intertwined directly with religion as well as every other social aspect of Athenian life. Socrates must defend his lifestyle in court, and while he may have been able to do just that, he holds a degree of arrogance, crucifying those who holds his life in their hands by critiquing their closemindedness, which ultimately leads to his death. Socrates says to have lived happily in poverty, and he never expected to be rewarded financially for his thinking, due to believing that is was not a profession to teach, but a duty. In fact, Socrates tells the court that the worst “punishment” they could possibly give him was free

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture