Asian American Studies 20A Midterm 1 Lecture Notes - Asian American Studies 20A Midterm 1 Lecture Notes Oral Histories Imperialism post-Columbus

Asian American Studies 20A Midterm 1 Lecture Notes -...

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Asian American Studies 20A Midterm 1 Lecture Notes Oral HistoriesImperialism: post-Columbus; Europeans want to colonize for spices and silk Immigration/Diaspora: one country immigrates and creates mini-communities Comparative Experience: different Asian American backgrounds Gender and Gender Roles: family unit; more men than women Generational Conflict: parents and kids think differently and have different goals Racial Antagonism: laws and stereotypes How Asian Americans Fit into the History We Know Theres no such thing as objectivehistory because history is done through a perspective Historiography: the process of writing history, compromises a series of choices about what to emphasize and what to leave in or out Watch out for the speaker and their perspective, what the speakers investments are (what they have to lose or gain), and what perspectives are being employed The Cultural Wars: conflicts over how people and different cultures are presented in society oRepresentation of Asian American history Need to think critically about history The New History Wars(New York Times, Grossman): people are not welcoming to critical studies History is the debate of how we discuss past experiences 3 major themes: race, imperialism, diaspora RaceNo longer matters in this country (Obama, Ferguson) A concept that symbolizes social conflicts and interests by referring to different types of human bodies Attributes characteristics to a group of people by phenotypic features Race is socially constructed, not scientifically based Concept of race is constantly changing ImperialismAsian Americans are part of imperialism in Asia Indirect influence economically, culturally, ideologically DiasporaThis study resource wasshared via CourseHero.com
Global connections are changing Asian Americans Spiro= to sow; dia= over oMeans scattering Groups scattered outside of their traditional homelands for many reasons (labor, slavery, commerce, war, colonization) Similarities between homeland and host land communities, along with differences oEx: organizational, political, social WWII Japan imperialized China: Japanese and Chinese Americans sympathize with one another oWhat happens in the homeland does not matter as much The International Context for 19thCentury Chinese Migration to the U.S. How Chinese are perceived by U.S. citizens and government and become stereotypes of other Asians in the future 16thcentury was mostly Filipino immigrants; galleon trade between Mexico and the Philippines (traded spices for silver) oManila men; some settled in the South Numbers matter The number of people migrating meant longevity (survival as a distinct group); gender balance and physical safety also needed for survival oCultures become mixed when minorities intermarry Visibility: everyone must take notice of presence

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