The Fates of Two Fathers - Garrett Edell Tu-Th Class Two...

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Garrett Edell 12/04/07 Tu-Th Class Two Tragic Fathers The betrayal of one’s children is completely heartbreaking to a parent. The death of one’s own child would be their utmost fear. In King Lear by William Shakespeare, the characters of Gloucester and King Lear are betrayed by their children and later on, watch them die. These two nobles experience the greatest possible pains a parent could feel. Both of their reactions to these traumatic experiences share similarities, yet there a few important differences to note. From the start of the play, Gloucester and King Lear are being deceived by their sinister children and falsely accusing their loyal ones. Lear asks his three daughters to publicly proclaim how much they love him. Goneril and Regan immediately profess how much they worship their father even though they are completely lying. They only say these things so they can acquire the land and power Lear is about to give them. Cordelia is the only one who tells the truth because she truly loves him and does not want the power, yet Lear becomes enraged and banishes her. In the previous scene Edmund and Gloucester are getting along and they seem to have a great and true relationship. However later on, it is revealed that Edmund wishes to frame his brother, Edgar, and eventually take his father’s
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position. Edmund is angry for being the illegitimate son and takes it out on Edgar and Gloucester.
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