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Running head: ALCOHOL USE DISORDER 1 Alcohol Use Disorder Mikki Armato Saint Leo University Abnormal Psychology PSY327 Dr. Barnes-Young June 16, 2019
ALCOHOL USE DISORDER 2 Abstract Alcohol use disorders (AUD) not only affects those with the disorder, but also affects their family, friends, and the community. In order to combat the disorders, it is important to learn about the risk factors, symptoms, and the treatments associated with AUD’s. It is also important for us to educate ourselves on alcoholism and alcohol use disorders, in order to limit our own risk factors and to support those we know and love who may be afflicted by these disorders.
ALCOHOL USE DISORDER 3 Alcohol Use Disorder Alcohol has a long history, with some reports dating back to 10,000 B.C. Alcoholic beverages have been used for medicinal purposes, for use as an antiseptic, and as an analgesic. For some cultures, alcohol, specifically beer and wine, was a source of nutrition. For millennia, alcohol has been used during social gatherings and in moderation, can be used to reduce stress and promotes a feeling of relaxation. Alcohol has been written about in many text, including those by Plato and are also included in the Bible. Although these texts and praises for alcohol existed, they also stressed the importance of moderation and limiting drunkenness. Although there is training, advertisements, and literature that expresses the importance of moderation and drinking responsibly, there are those who are unable or unwilling to limit their alcohol intake. These individuals may be abusing alcohol or they may depend on alcohol. Although there are differences, the disorder is the same and falls under alcohol use disorder (AUD). DSM-5 The DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for alcohol use disorder differs from the DSM-IV diagnostic criteria. An examination by Slade et al, 2016, described the changes from the previously used diagnostic criteria and the updated DSM-V. Four major changes were established, the first being the distinction between alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence was removed, and the DSM-V AUD is a single disorder. Second, alcohol-related legal issues was removed, and no longer is a criterion for AUD. Third, craving or a strong desire to drink alcohol was added to the diagnostic criteria and fourth, the separate thresholds for alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence were changed. In the DSM-IV, alcohol abuse required one our of four symptom criteria to be met, and alcohol dependence required three out of seven symptom
ALCOHOL USE DISORDER 4 criteria to be met. In the DSM-V, to be diagnosed with AUD, the patient must meet two our eleven symptom criteria, but there are also classes of severity, with two or three symptom criteria indicated mild AUD, four to five symptom criteria indicating moderate AUD, and 6 or more symptom criteria met indicated severe AUD (Slade et al., 2016).

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