NR507_Week5.docx - 1 Week 5 Open Forum Discussion\u2014Pyloric Stenosis The presentation I would expect to see in a three-month-old baby boy with pyloric

NR507_Week5.docx - 1 Week 5 Open Forum...

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1 Week 5: Open Forum Discussion—Pyloric Stenosis The presentation I would expect to see in a three-month-old baby boy with pyloric stenosis is non-bilious projectile vomiting (Hamidi, 2016). In a positive feeding test, I might see visible gastric peristaltic waves, and—if a tumor is involved—an olive- shaped palpable abdominal mass located in the right upper quadrant (Jaafar & Saeed, 2018). The etiology of pyloric stenosis has not yet been clearly determined, but the condition occurs at a ratio of 4:1 in boys as compared with girls (Wenk et al., 2017). The condition is also more common in industrialized countries and among first-born infants (Wenk et al., 2017). The pathophysiological process of pyloric stenosis leads to the signs and symptoms due to the fact that pyloric stenosis is an enlargement of the pyloric muscle that causes a narrowing of the gastric outlet (Wenk et al., 2017). The narrow gastric outlet—along with the tumor, if there is one—causes projectile
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