Discussion Petition the Government for Redress of Grievances\u201d.docx - Discussion\"Petition the Government for Redress of Grievances\u201d Textbook Magstadt

Discussion  Petition the Government for Redress of Grievances”.docx

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Discussion "Petition the Government for Redress of Grievances”Textbook:Magstadt, T. (2017). Understanding politics: Ideas, institutions, and issues (12th ed.). Boston, MA: Cengage.Required ResourcesRead/review the following resources for this activity:Textbook: Chapter 11, 12, 13Lesson
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Additional scholarly sources you identify through your ownresearchInitial Post InstructionsAnalyze why older, white adults vote in elections more than other groups while describing how each political party cultivates voters and the role an interest group plays in turning people out to the polls.You can explore political voting data at the United States Census Bureau's website here:-sector/voting.html (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Use evidence (cite sources) to support your response from assigned readings or online lessons,and
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at least two outside scholarly sources.----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------On line Lesson:IntroductionThe United States Constitution guarantees the right for the people to redress the government about any grievances. This guarantee is the fundamental right of the US's representative-constitutional democracy. An essential part of this right is voting. Although the voter is at the center, getting policies passed to deal with issues is a complex system with different individuals and groups. During this week, we begin to see how various problems are brought through the legislative andcourt system with a variety of actors.Player Theories
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Politics is often considered a game. As in any sport, there are players, usually at least two players against each other. Understanding politics as a game, elite theories suggest a small group holds power to make meaningful change in any democratic system that is more fully developed. Mills and Michels, both sociologists, from the 1950s, explained that only a small number of people are in control of the democracy using their money and influence to protect their interests without regard for the public good (Magstadt, 2017).Michels promulgated his theory, iron law of oligarchy, mostlynoting that only a few people hold the authority in any organization. Elitist theorists believe that in a democracy only a few political bosses from the political parties and select wealthy interest groups that hold power are always advancing their own interests.The Election SystemThere are different types of electoral systems, and their influence on political parties is essential to how these groups form. Single-member districts mostly support a two-party system, whereas proportional systems allow for a multiparty structure.
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To receive a majority of the votes in a plurality system, where the winner takes all, the platforms of smaller parties must band together to become viable contenders in the race.
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