HST318 Syllabus 2019 Fall B.pdf - H S T 3 1 8 H I S T O R Y O F E N G I N E E R I N G COURSE INFORMATION Course Number HST 318 Credits 3 Credit Hours

HST318 Syllabus 2019 Fall B.pdf - H S T 3 1 8 H I S T O R Y...

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Unformatted text preview: H S T 3 1 8 : H I S T O R Y O F E N G I N E E R I N G COURSE INFORMATION Course Number: HST 318 Credits: 3 Credit Hours Pre-­‐requisites: None This is an online course. You can log into your course via MyASU ( ), or you may go directly to Canvas ( .) INSTRUCTOR CONTACT Instructor Name: Mark Clark Office: Online Instructor Email address: [email protected] Office hours: By email appointment OVERVIEW Catalog description: HST 318: History of Engineering This course introduces students to the history of engineering. Our focus will be primarily on the development and practices of engineering in America, but just like American engineers have done throughout history, we will draw on developments in other times and places as well. We will explore questions such as: who were the early American engineers, and where did they learn their engineering skills? Why did American engineers create professional societies in the late nineteenth century? What are the relationships between engineering and science? How have military priorities shaped the practice of engineering over time? Who gets to be an engineer and why are some excluded? A central theme of this course will be the mutual shaping of engineering and society. At each moment in history, the practice of engineering reflects the values, cultures, and institutions of American society. But equally importantly, engineers and the activities they undertake have helped transform American life-­‐-­‐altering the ways people have lived, worked, and played. Engineering is not simply the art of designing and building widgets-­‐-­‐it is part of the social and material fabric of everyday life. Learning Outcomes: At the completion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Outline and identify historical milestones in the development of engineering and its connections to social and cultural contexts 2. Discuss the social dimensions of professionalization in engineering 3. Describe the relationships between science and engineering 4. Assess the influence of military institutions on the practices of American engineering 5. Analyze power dynamics and inequalities within engineering Course Time Commitment: This three-­‐credit course requires approximately 135 hours of work. Please expect to spend around 18 hours each week preparing for and actively participating in this course. MATERIALS NEEDED REQUIRED TEXTS There are no required texts you need to purchase for this course. All readings will be available via Canvas, public URLs, or the ASU Library web site. COMPUTER REQUIREMENTS • • • • • • Desktop or laptop computer with Internet access, current within the last 5 years (Note: Canvas does have an app that can be used with mobile devices, but the app is limited and does not show everything available in the course. Please access Canvas primarily through a desktop or laptop computer.) Web browser updated to the most recent possible version (Note: Internet Explorer does not work reliably with Canvas. Please use a browser such as Firefox, Chrome, Safari, or Opera.) Audio speakers attached or built-­‐in to the computer Word processing software (optional but recommended) Citation software, such as Zotero, Mendeley, or End Note. This will make your research and paper-­‐writing experience much easier. Webcam and microphone. INSTRUCTION AND GRADING This course uses Canvas for the facilitation of communications between faculty and students, submission of assignments, and posting of grades. Activities in this course include discussions, presentations, textbook and supplemental readings, individual and group activities, and case scenarios. Students are expected to log in to class daily. All assignments, unless otherwise announced by the instructor, MUST be submitted via Canvas. Each assignment will have a designated place to submit the assignment. Do not submit an assignment via email. GRADING PROCEDURE Percentage Point Value Your final grade will be based on the following: Discussions 20% A+ 97-­‐100 Quizzes on lectures and documentaries 10% A 94-­‐96 Capstone assignments + pre-­‐module questions 30% A -­‐ 90-­‐93 Midterm video review project 5% B+ 87-­‐89 Midterm 15% B 84-­‐86 Final video review project 5% B-­‐ 80-­‐83 Final exam 15% C+ 77-­‐79 Total 100% C 70-­‐76 D 60-­‐69 F < 60 The course grade will be based on the assignments and compliance with deadlines and rubric guidelines. Graded assignments will be available within 72 hours of the due date via the Gradebook. Grade TIMELINESS Students are expected to turn in assignments on time. Grades will be lowered on late papers or assignments by 10% per day except where extensions and incompletes are negotiated with the instructor. Extensions and incompletes will be based on extenuating circumstances beyond the student’s control. If an assignment is to be handed in late, the instructor must be contacted at least 24 hours in advance of the due date for an extension to be negotiated. Please follow the appropriate University policies to request an accommodation for religious practices ( -­‐04.html) or to accommodate a missed assignment due to University-­‐sanctioned activities. ( -­‐02.html) PLAGIARISM Students are expected to write assignments in their own words except where otherwise cited. All direct quotes must appear either in quotation marks or indented, and must include the source, year, and page number(s). Material taken from other authors that is paraphrased must also include source information. Plagiarism software will be used to ensure the originality of the students' writings. Noncompliance with these requirements constitutes plagiarism and is grounds for a failing grade. ASSIGNMENTS DISCUSSION BOARDS There will be discussion topics throughout the semester, to which you are required to respond. For each discussion prompt, you are expected to create at least one original post, and to respond to at least three threads involving other students. Respectful disagreement with other students is allowed; indeed, healthy debate is encouraged. However, disrespectful, inflammatory, judgmental, or rude language will not be tolerated. You must also use proper grammar and spelling. You do not have to adhere to a highly formal tone, but emojis, “text-­‐lish” and other invented spellings are not allowed. The grading rubric for each discussion board will be found on Canvas. QUIZZES Lectures and documentaries have quizzes that must be completed to receive full credit. PRE-­‐MODULE QUESTIONS Starting in module 2, you must answer a pre-­‐module question to view the rest of the unit materials. There are no right or wrong answers to pre-­‐module questions; they are designed to get you to reflect on what you currently know beforehand to see if and how your views change based on the history we study together. CAPSTONE ASSIGNMENTS Each course module will have a cumulative capstone assignment that asks you to integrate the various sources you studied (lectures, readings, documentaries, pre-­‐module questions, and discussion boards) to answer overarching questions about the module’s themes and content. These will be written assignments. VIDEO REVIEW PROJECTS Before the midterms and final, you will work in small groups to prepare a short video to share with your discussion group analyzing the preceding three modules. One of the best ways to tell if you know material well is to be able to teach it, so this assignment will help prepare you and your classmates to do well on the midterm and final. MIDTERM AND FINAL EXAMS After modules 3 and 6, there will be a midterm and final exam. They will consist of a variety of question types (true/false, matching, multiple choice, fill-­‐in-­‐the-­‐blank, short essay). More information on the exams will be made available in the course. COURSE POLICIES COMMUNICATING WITH THE INSTRUCTOR Look for the answer first. This course uses a "Three Before Me" policy for student to faculty communications. When questions arise during the course of this class, please remember to check these three sources for an answer before contacting your instructor: 1. Course Syllabus 2. Announcements in Canvas 3. The Community Forum Where to post your questions. If you cannot find an answer to your question, and it is a question of a general nature (such as clarification on an assignment, or where to find something in Canvas, for example) please post your question to the Community Forum. This Forum can display your questions and answers for the benefit of all students. Students can answer each others' questions here, too. Your instructor will post answers on the Community Forum within 1 business day. If your question is specific to your situation (such as asking about your grades, for example), then you should send an email to your instructor personally. This policy will help you in potentially identifying answers before your instructor can get back to you, and it also helps prevent your instructors from answering similar questions or concerns multiple times. Announcements and emails from your instructor. Whenever your instructor posts an announcement, Canvas will automatically send you an email. Your instructor may send you a private email message occasionally, as well, concerning specific issues. ASU e-­‐mail is the official means of communication among ASU's students, faculty, and staff. All instructor correspondence will be sent to your ASU e-­‐mail account. Forwarding emails to and from your ASU to a different account is not recommended. Students are expected to ensure that their ASU e-­‐mail is accessed, read, and acted upon in a regular and timely fashion. Students bear the responsibility of missed messages and should check their ASU-­‐assigned e-­‐mail on a regular basis. GRADE APPEALS/GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE Grade disputes must first be addressed by discussing the situation with the instructor. If the dispute is not resolved with the instructor, the student may appeal to the department chair per the University Policy for Student Appeal Procedures on Grades ( ). STUDENT CONDUCT Netiquette. Students must maintain a cordial atmosphere and use tact in expressing differences of opinion. The instructor may delete inappropriate discussion board messages. Students may be notified privately that their posting was inappropriate. If necessary, a student may be withdrawn for disruptive behavior with a mark of W or E. The Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities accepts incident reports from students, faculty, staff, or other persons who believe that a student or a student organization may have violated the Student Code of Conduct. Academic Integrity. ASU expects and requires all its students to act with honesty and integrity, and respect the rights of others in carrying out all academic assignments. Students are expected to adhere to the ASU Academic Integrity policy ( ). Anyone in violation of this policy is subject to sanctions. The possible sanctions include, but are not limited to, appropriate grade penalties, course failure (indicated on the transcript as a grade of E), course failure due to academic dishonesty (indicated on the transcript as a grade of XE), loss of registration privileges, disqualification and dismissal. Please refer to university policies regarding these matters and other courses of action that may be taken. DROP AND ADD DATES/WITHDRAWALS There is a limited timeline to drop or add the course ( -­‐calendar). Consult with your advisor and notify your instructor to add or drop this course. If you are considering a withdrawal, review the following ASU policies: • • • Withdrawal from Classes ( -­‐08.html) Medical/Compassionate Withdrawal ( -­‐ 09.html) Grade of Incomplete ( -­‐09.html) ASU AND RELATED PROFESSIONAL POLICIES Students are responsible for reviewing and complying with all ASU policies, including the following: • • • • Academic Integrity Policy: Student Code of Conduct: (click on ABOR Student Code of Conduct) Computer, Internet, and Electronic Communications Policy: Accommodations for Religious Practices: -­‐ 04.html STUDENT SUCCESS This is an online course. To be successful: • • • • • • Check the course daily, to stay in touch with the material and activities Read announcements! This is the only way your instructor can update you on course information. Create a personal organization system to keep track of due dates specified. (Canvas's calendar may be able to help, if you like this format.) Communicate regularly with your instructor and peers Create a study and/or assignment schedule to stay on track. This is an online course, and you must be very self-­‐motivated to stay on track and not get behind. As mentioned before, please expect to spend approximately __ hours a week preparing for and actively participating in this course. Set aside regular times in which you can do your classwork with minimal interruptions or distractions. Avoid multi-­‐tasking while doing online studying. Treat this with the same respect as you would a face-­‐to-­‐face class environment. • • • Copy and paste discussion board posts into a text document on your personal computer before submitting them. Technical glitches in Canvas, while rare, do happen, and it is frustrating to lose hours of work. Learn about and use the student resources available to you! You can get free assistance from the ASU Library, IT Support, the Writing Center, and more. For additional information, tips, and resources, visit the resources for students learning online at SUPPORTS AVAILABLE TO YOU WRITING CENTER Students are encouraged to access the writing center for free assistance with their papers. ASU Writing Centers offer a dynamic, supportive learning environment for undergraduate and graduate students at any stage of the writing process. Students who use the writing center for help with their papers tend to earn higher grades than those who do not. Free online writing tutoring is available at -­‐tutoring. ACCESSIBILITY Every effort has been made to ensure that this online course meets the accessibility standards of Section 504, and the W3 Consortium. Should you require additional support, please contact the Disability Resource Center. It is important to register with them as soon as possible, so there is time to access the services needed. In compliance with the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Section 504, and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, professional disability specialists and support staff at the Disability Resource Centers (DRC) facilitate a comprehensive range of academic support services and accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. Qualified students with disabilities may be eligible to receive academic support services and accommodations ( -­‐ 01.html). Eligibility is based on qualifying disability documentation and assessment of individual need. The DRC will make every effort to provide reasonable accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. Qualified students who wish to request an accommodation for a disability should contact the Disability Resource Center (DRC): Website: Phone: 480-­‐965-­‐1234 (Voice) 480-­‐965-­‐9000 (TTY) TECHNICAL SUPPORT For technical assistance 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, please contact the University Technology Office Help Desk: Phone: 855-­‐ASU-­‐5080 (855-­‐278-­‐5080) Web: links.asu.edu/myasuservice For information on systems outages see the ASU systems status calendar, please visit and SYLLABUS DISCLAIMER The syllabus is a statement of intent and serves as an implicit agreement between the instructor and the student. Every effort will be made to avoid changing the course schedule, but the possibility exists that unforeseen events will make syllabus changes necessary. Please remember to check your ASU email and the course site often. ASSIGNMENT SCHEDULE All assignments are due by 11:59 pm, Arizona time, of the date listed. You are responsible for calculating the time zone difference between Arizona and wherever you live. Note that Arizona does not observe Daylight Savings. Schedule at a Glance Course Orientation: 10/16 Module 1: 10/17 – 10/23 Module 2: 10/24 – 10/30 Module 3: 10/31 – 11/6 Midterm group review project: 11/7 – 11/9 Midterm: 11/10 – 11/11 Module 4: 11/12 – 11/18 Module 5: 11/19 – 11/25 Module 6: 11/26 – 12/2 Final group review project: 12/3 – 12/4 Final: 12/5 – 12/6 10/16 Course Orientation Activities: Course orientation Assessments: Syllabus agreement 10/17 – 10/23 (5/20) Module 1: Roots of American Engineering Activities: Watch lectures Complete readings Watch documentary Participate in discussion Assessments: • • • • Upload introductory video (10/16) Discussion threads related to readings and lectures (first post for each due by 10/22; responses for each by 10/23) • Quizzes on lectures and documentary (all completed by 10/23) • Capstone Assignment (10/23) Module 2: Engineering Comes of Age 10/24 – 10/30 Activities: • • • • • • Complete pre-­module question Watch lectures Complete readings Watch documentary 10/31 – 11/6 • Participate in discussion Assessments: • Discussion threads related to readings and lectures (first post for each due by 10/29; responses for each by 10/30) • Quizzes on lectures and documentary (all completed by 10/30) • Capstone Assignment (completed by 10/30) Module 3: Engineering and Invention 11/7 – 11/9 Complete pre-­‐module question Watch lectures Complete readings Watch documentary Participate in discussion Assessments: • Discussion threads related to readings and lectures (first post for each due by 11/5; responses for each by 11/6) • Quizzes on lectures and documentary (all completed by 11/6) • Capstone Assignment (completed by 11/6) Video Review Project Activities: • • • • • Activities: • • Work with group to create review video Review classmate videos and provide feedback Assessments: • Upload review video (completed by 11/9) • Watch review videos of classmates and provide feedback (completed by 11/10) 11/10 – 11/11 Midterm Complete midterm exam (11/11) 11/12 – 11/18 Module 4: Engineering and Science Activities: Complete pre-­‐module question Watch lectures Complete readings Watch documentary Participate in discussion Assessments: • Discussion threads related to readings and lectures (first post for each due by 11/17; responses for each by 11/18) • Quizzes on lectures and documentary (all completed by 11/18) • Capstone Assignment (completed by 11/18) Module 5: Engineering and the Military 11/19 – 11/25 Activities: • • • • • • • Complete pre-­‐module question Watch lectures Complete readings Watch documentary Participate in discussion Assessments: • Discussion threads related to readings and lectures (first post for each due by 11/24; responses for each by 11/25) • Quizzes on lectures and documentary (all completed by 11/25) • Capstone Assignment (completed by 11/25) Module 6: The Politics of Algorithms • • • 11/26 – 12/2 Activities: Complete pre-­‐module question Watch lectures Complete readings Watch documentary Participate in discussion Assessments: • Discussion threads related to readings and lectures (first post for each due by 12/1; responses for each by 12/2) • Quizzes on lectures and documentary (all completed by 12/2) • Capstone Assignment (completed by 12/2) Video Review Project • • • • • 12/3 – 12/4 Activities: • • 12/5 – 12/6 Work with group to create review video Review classmate videos and provide feedback Assessments: • Upload review video (completed by 12/4) • Watch review videos of classmates and provide feedback (completed by 12/5) Final Complete final exam (12/6) ...
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