An Archaeology of Mothering - An Archaeology of Mothering...

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An Archaeology of Mothering 03/12/2007 14:12:00 An African-American Midwife’s Tale Archaeobiography House occupied by the Perryman family in Mobile, AL Prof Wilkie got involved in 1994 (land alterations to put in a baseball field) Her friend George was a land architect getting a masters in archaeology There was no legal requirement that any archaeology would be done (no state/federal money) Features Both belonged to the Perryman family (two houses – one lived in by Lucrecia and one lived in by her daughter Caroline, all enslaved) Lucrecia Perryman was a midwife (had over 400 medicine bottles) African American midwives had been the primary caretaker of both black and white birthing until the 1920s (when the American Medical Association opened up new avenues for young medical students that cut down midwives) By the 1920s all midwives had to be registered and then 1930s they were pretty much all gone The well corresponds to when Lucrecia retired from being a midwife The first site corresponds to the 1880s (when Marshall died)
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This note was uploaded on 04/01/2008 for the course ANTHRO 2AC taught by Professor Wilkie during the Fall '07 term at University of California, Berkeley.

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An Archaeology of Mothering - An Archaeology of Mothering...

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