Lecture4 - The World of Sensors The future of computing: a...

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Unformatted text preview: The World of Sensors The future of computing: a world of embedded processors intimately connected to the world around them, using sensors and actuators to both monitor and shape their physical surroundings D. Tennenhouse, Proactive Computing, Communications of the ACM, May 2000. In fact, most (all?) embedded systems use sensors to detect and measure changes in their environment- sensors for position and velocity- wireless receiver: responds to electromagnetic radiation- pushbutton, or keypad: monitors two states, off and on- barcode scanner- infrared sensor for stereo remote control- handwriting recognition on Palm Pilot--- hundreds or thousands of different sensing technologies. For example, see [1], [2], [3], [5], from which the examples in these notes are taken. EECS461, Lecture 4, updated September 17, 2007 1 Uses of Sensors Monitor changes and report to operator (e.g., turn warning light on) Record or process data stream Take action: turn something on or off Suppose CPU processes sensor signals and uses the result to modify system using an actuator...these modifications are then measured by the sensor Physical System sensor CPU actuator operator input A feedback system EECS461, Lecture 4, updated September 17, 2007 2 The Future of Sensors One of the most rapidly growing areas of technology (see IEEE Spectrum and other trade magazines) National Science Foundation Engineering Research Center for Wireless Integrated Microsystems (WIMS) located at the University of Michigan- Micromachined Vibratory Ring Gyroscope to measure rate or angle of rotation- Microaccelerometer to measure micro-g and nano-g accleration, used for inertial navigation, microgravity measurements in space, virtual reality platforms- Silicon-probe technology to acquire 3-D images of the electrical activity in the brain- poly-diamond strain gauges for cochlear implants- environmental sensor arrays to detect pollutants or biological agents- Many more: www.wimserc.org EECS461, Lecture 4, updated September 17, 2007 3 Issues with Sensors...
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This note was uploaded on 04/01/2008 for the course EECS 461 taught by Professor Cook during the Winter '08 term at University of Michigan.

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Lecture4 - The World of Sensors The future of computing: a...

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