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Running Head: JACKSONIAN SYMBOLISM AND POLICIES Written Assignment 7: Jacksonian Symbolism and Policies Michael Esh Thomas Edison State University 1
JACKSONIAN SYMBOLISM AND POLICIES Abstract
JACKSONIAN SYMBOLISM AND POLICIES Written Assignment 7: Jacksonian Symbolism and Policies In 1828, Andrew Jackson became the seventh president of the United States. His election was unique in the fact that, unlike every president before him, he came from very humble beginnings. As a boy, he received only sporadic education. As a young man, he studied law, and went on to become a United States congressman, then a senator, and later a judge. (Brinkley, 2015) Jackson’s election changed the presidency and even the very nature of American democracy. In this essay, we will examine his policies on a number of issues. In the years before 1828, there was a significant increase in the number of people who were given the right to vote. Previously the right to vote was limited to white males who were property owners or taxpayers, a relatively small group of people. But the newer states joining the Union began giving all white male the right to vote and allowing any voter the right to hold office. Some of the older states, afraid that they would lose people to the new, western states, adopted similar relaxed voting requirements. The election of 1828 was important because Andrew Jackson, more than any president before him, was elected by the common man. In 1824, fewer than 27 percent of white males had cast a vote in the presidential election. But in 1828, that number rose to 58 percent and to 80 percent by the next election in 1832. (Brinkley, 2015) Jackson also introduced the idea of the “spoils system.” While the practice was already common in some of the states, Jackson brought it to the federal level. The “spoils system” referred to the practice of the president appointing political allies or friends to key positions within the government. Jackson argued that these positions belonged to the people and not to

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