Reaction Paper #7.docx - Isabel Gouse Intro to Africana...

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Isabel Gouse Intro to Africana Studies 101 Reaction Paper #7 10/16/19 Dagbovie: Black Women Historians from the late 19th Century to the Dawning of the Civil Rights Movement Summary: In his essay, Dagbovie writes about the largely ignored history of pioneering African American women historians from the late 19 th century through the mid 20 th century. The history of African American women historians is full of tribulations and triumphs. During the “nadir of black life,” i.e. end of reconstruction to early 20 th century, African American women had to overcome a different set of barriers than their male counterparts and were often systematically excluded from participating in mainstream U.S. and African American academe. The author categorizes this diverse group of women into three main categories: progressive era novelists, “historians without a portfolio” (i.e. self-taught historians) from the 1890s through the 1930s, and professionally trained historians who have earned their doctorates. Following this analysis, the author provides a more detailed account of specific women in each category and the importance of their work. According to Dagbovie, African American women novelists wrote "female-centered domestic novels" that critically addressed controversial issues and events in U.S. history, such as slavery, the Civil War, and Reconstruction. Self-taught African American women historians produced practical and insightful historical scholarship. Although they were not formally trained, these women challenged the widely accepted notion that a woman's place was in the domestic sphere. Finally, the last category of African American women historians are those who have been

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