Reaction Paper #6 10_3.docx - 1Isabel Gouse Reaction...

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1Isabel Gouse Reaction Paper #6 Intro to Africana Studies 10/3/19 Dagbovie: A Pioneer of Black Studies and History Summary The main purpose of chapter two, “A Pioneer of Black Studies and History,” by Dagbovie is to enumerate the important contributions that Carter G. Woodson made to the early black history movement. Woodson worked hard to extend the study of black history to the working class and youth sectors of the black community because he felt that knowledge was power. By setting the historical record straight and teaching black history in schools, Woodson argued that black youth would develop a sense of pride and self-worth, and more importantly racism would be abolished. To achieve this goal, Woodson undertook numerous efforts including extending himself as a resource to black communities and encouraging a wide breadth of nonacademic people in the black community to attend ASNLH meetings. In the chapter, Dagbovie zooms in on two of Woodson’s most successful efforts – the creation of Negro History Week and the founding of the Negro History Bulletin. Since much of the miseducation of black people occurred in schools, Woodson was a strong advocate for integrating black history into the American educational system. However, he approached this goal gradually by encouraging schools to participate in Negro History Week, rather than demanding that black history be integrated immediately into the curriculum. Negro History Week turned out to be very successful and it was considered by many, including Dagbovie himself, to be a monumental movement with far-reaching positive effects. The Negro History Bulletin functioned as a resource for black teachers who had little to no knowledge of black history, as well as a discussion forum for teachers about how to incorporate black history into their curriculums. The Bulletin also served as a platform for Woodson to raise his concerns and criticisms about white America, black intellectuals, black political leaders, the black middle class, the U.S. government, and American society. According to Woodson, the Bulletin was extremely successful at penetrating the minds of the black community, inspiring black youth, and deconstructing racial prejudice

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