Benchmark - Child Custody and Support Essay.docx - Marie Clark July 21th 2019 Benchmark Child Custody and Support Essay GOV 360 Introduction Parents who

Benchmark - Child Custody and Support Essay.docx - Marie...

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Marie Clark July 21th, 2019Benchmark - Child Custody and Support EssayGOV 360IntroductionParents who have chosen to dissolve a relationship through divorce or separation of another nature, can be a challenging decision determining the custody arrangement of a child. Custody disputes can stem into legal actions in which the courts must decide who the child will dwell with, one parent or the other. The courts attempt to place the child with the parent who has the best interest of the child in mind. “Determining what is best for a particular child inevitably involves judgments about the hierarchy of and trade-offs between often competing values. Presumably with the goal of providing greater guidance and more consistent decision making, many states now list criteria that a court is asked to use in applying the best-interests standard.” (Mnookin, 2014)Upon the dissolution of a parent’s relationship negotiation is used to determine a child custody arrangement. The better the two parties are at negotiating the more gratifying the agreement is. Most parents are involved with their child from infancy to adulthood. Parents who want to continue to be involved with their children must find a way to work together. Children usually want to stay involved with both parents unless dangerous factors are involved. These factors can include but are not limited to domestic violence, child abuse, child neglect, and alcohol/ drug abuse. When parents are unable to come to an agreement the court will intervene and impose a
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decision. These decisions, though aimed at protecting and preserving the best interests of the children, are often very different from what the parents want or feel is appropriateThere are several different types of custody agreements in which the two parties or the court will can agree too. “Legal Custody: Parents who have legal custody are able to make legal decisions on matters impacting the child.Physical Custody: Children live with parents who have physical custody.Sole Custody: One parent has both physical and legal custody of the child. The other parent may have visitation rights, but does not have any custodial rights, and cannot make decisions affecting the child.Joint Legal Custody: In a situation of joint legal custody, both parents have a say in decisions that impact the child. In the event of a major dispute between parents who share joint legal custody, the courts can settle the dispute.
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