The Renaissance Papacy - The Renaissance Papacy Names...

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The Renaissance Papacy
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Names, Places Nicholas V, 1447-55 Sixtus IV, 1471-84 [della Rovere} Alexander VI [Borgia], 1493-1503 Julius II [della Rovere], 1503-13 Leo X [Medici], 1513-1522 Clement VII [Medici], 1523-34 Girolamo Savonarola, Martin Luther Nepotism Donato Bramante, 1444-1514 Paul III, 1534-50
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Outline Rebuilding the Papacy 1. Escaping conciliar control 2. Shaping the Papal State 3. Family politics a. Della Rovere b. Borgia c. Medici 4. Critics: Savonarola; Erasmus; Luther Rebuilding Rome 1. A new center of Renaissance Culture 2. Urban renewal as a demonstration of power
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Julius Excluded from Heaven Julius: If the pope is to be corrected, it should be by a general council, but against the will of the pope a council can’t be
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Unformatted text preview: called….And finally my last defense is absolute power, of which the pope possesses more, all by himself, then an entire council. In short, the pope can’t be removed from office for any crime whatsoever. • Peter: Not for homicide? • Julius: Not for parricide. • Peter: Not for fornication? • Julius: Ridiculous. Not for incest. • Peter: This is new doctrine about the dignity of the pope that I’ve picked up here; he alone, it seems, is entitled to be the worst of me. I’ve also learned about a new misery for the church, that she alone is unable to rid herself of a monster…....
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  • Spring '08
  • Hughes
  • Martin Luther, Pope Alexander VI, Julius II, Della Rovere

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