Topic 3 (PDF) Parts 4_5_6_7_8_9.pdf - Topic 3 Parts 4\/5\/6\/7\/8\/9 Part 4 \u2022 Life in the Colonies New England Grand Banks off the New England coast They

Topic 3 (PDF) Parts 4_5_6_7_8_9.pdf - Topic 3 Parts...

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Topic 3Parts 4/5/6/7/8/9
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Part 4Life in the Colonies: New England
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Grand Banks, off the New England coast. They become great fishing areas for the colonists.
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CodHerringMackerel Types of fish that were prevalent off the New England coastline at the “Grand Banks.”
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New England was also economically prosperous in whaling. It is no coincidence that the American classic novel Moby Dickwas set in New England sea towns.
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Before the drilling of crude oil from the ground, whale oil was one of the only ways to burn lamps as shown in this antique lamp from the 1700s.
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Replica of an 18th century ship built in New England—shipbuilding was another prosperous venture in the New England colonies.
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12. New England: Economy Fishing/Whaling: Just north of New England was a region of the Atlantic Ocean known as the “Grand Banks,” which has an abundance of fish and whales including cod, mackerel, and herring. New England’s coastline was perfect for fishing/whaling because of its many harbors and its excess of timber for building fishing boats. Lumbering/Shipbuilding: New Hampshire and Maine were particularly covered with dense forests. New England was also covered with waterfalls which served to power sawmills. Because of this, other colonies and England bought heavy amounts of barrels, furniture, and building materials from the New England colonies. Because of New England’s proximity to the sea, the lumber could also be used to build ships quickly and cheaply. Farming: the crops grown in New England were not in great demand anywhere else. NE never developed cash crops or plantations. Small farms made up the NE landscape, with the main crop being corn. Although barley, oats, rye, beans, peas, pumpkins, and especially apples all began to be cultivated.
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13. New England: GovernmentPuritan Views on Land: Puritans did not believe in granting land to individuals, they instead believed in granting land to groups of people so they may live and work together. Because of this theory, Puritans in New England began to develop more and more towns. The town became the backbone New England society. Town Meetings: New England town residents met to discuss local problems and issues. Only “free men” were allowed to vote on issues, although anyone could attend and voice opinions. These early town meetings in New England are examples of direct democracy, or directly voting on issues and laws. Selectmen: after town meetings became to frequent, the town began to elect officials known as “selectmen.” Importance of Town Meetings: New England settlers developed a strong belief they had the right to govern themselves which set the stage for the American Revolution.
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Published in 1850, The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne becomes an American classic by criticizing many of the Puritan strict laws and “holy watching.”
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Witch Hillby Thomas Satterwhite. Sketch of a young woman being put to death after her “witch trial.”
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14. New England: SocietyPuritan Ways of Life: Church:
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