Solar Lab Report - Solar Energy Lab Report By Zoya Gayle ENVT 0845 Section 002 Kasra Niavol TA Professor Kevin Magerr Lab Date Date Submitted October 2

Solar Lab Report - Solar Energy Lab Report By Zoya Gayle...

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Solar Energy Lab Report By: Zoya Gayle ENVT 0845: Section 002 Kasra Niavol, TA Professor Kevin Magerr Lab Date: September 25, 2019 Date Submitted: October 2, 2019 Purpose:
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The purpose of this lab experiment was to see how distance, shading, and filters can affect the output of photovoltaic cells (PV). By doing this experiment, we explored the potential factors of renewable energy. To calculate the amount of power that was produced by the PV cells, we used the equation P=iV, where P is power (Watt), i is current (Ampere), and V is voltage (Volt). Materials: The materials used to conduct the experiment were the photovoltaic cell, color filters, ceiling lamp, multimeter, measuring tape, and electrical wire with alligator clips. Each of these items were essential in calculating the data in our experiment. Method: We started the experiment by connecting the multimeter, electrical wire, and photovoltaic cell together. To do this we connected the red and black alligator clips to the red and black wires on the PV cell. The connected device was used throughout the whole experiment to record data. Once everything was connected, we turned on the ceiling lamp to test if the wires were correctly attached and could successfully take readings. Step 2 of the experiment consisted of positioning the ceiling lamp at different distances from the PV cell and recording the voltage and current readings. Our group’s distances varied from 4 inches to 30 inches and after six recordings, we calculated the power output using P=iV . Our results proved that the larger distance between the PV cell and light source, the less power it will produce. On to Step 3, we placed the ceiling lamp at a fixed distance directly above the PV cell and kept it there for our next set of readings. Next, we placed a colored filter completely over the PV cell and recorded the current and voltage readings. We repeated this procedure seven different times for all the colored filters and then calculated the power using P=iV. Finally for Step 4, we kept the ceiling light at the same distance as Step 3, directly above the PV cell. The, using a piece of cardboard we covered one of the 10 cells on the PV cell and recorded the current and voltage readings. For each reading we covered another cell until the whole cell was completely covered by the cardboard. We concluded the
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