Women of the Revolution - Sophia Campbell Michael Bible...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 8 pages.

Sophia Campbell Michael Bible American History 12 November 2018 Women of the Revolution Women have always been equally as important and influential in monumental historical events as men, but they’ve always been written out of the narrative. Looking back through America’s history, only the stories of the accomplished men have been told, they have entire books written about them in which the women have only a chapter. People know the names of the founding fathers and the leaders of the revolution, but not the names of the women who fought alongside them. Women’s achievements in history, and even in modern times, are written off, while their glory is given to undeserving men who get to take credit for their successes. Men didn’t fight these wars alone, the women were there with them, on and off the battlefield. When the men went off to fight, their communities didn’t stop and their jobs weren’t left unfilled, the women stepped up. For every man you see represented in history books, there is an equally important woman who never got the full credit that she deserved. Women played essential roles in the revolutionary war, some were traditional like nurses, seamstresses, cooks and maids, and some were more unconventional such as soldiers, and even spies. There were also many women doing other important things in literature, society, and politics away from the battlefields. Many nurses in the war began as camp followers. Camp followers were close female relatives to the soldiers who could no longer support themselves after the men left for the war, so they traveled with the army and searched for food and safety. The camp followers would help with the domestic side of the army and would do the washing, cooking, and repair the soldier’s clothes. Women were sometimes placed unexpectedly in the middle of a battle and ended up becoming war heroes. Mary Ludwig Hays, born in 1744 to German immigrants in Pennsylvania,
was one of these women. She married William Hays, a Patriot involved in the 1774 boycott of British goods that arose as a protest for the unfair tax being placed on the colonies. In 1777, Hays enlisted in the Continental Army and was trained as an artilleryman. Mary traveled with him and joined a group of camp followers led by Martha Washington. They took care of the troops, washed clothes, made food, and helped care for sick or injured soldiers. In the Battle of Monmouth, Mary Hays carried water from a spring to the soldiers under heavy fire from the British. When her husband collapsed, either from injury or heat, and was carried off of the battlefield, Mary took his place at his cannon. Once, a cannonball came so close, that it actually went between her legs, ripping her petticoat. She is known to have said something like, "Well, that could have been worse," and then went back to firing her cannon. Private Joseph Martin recorded this in his journal and wrote: While in the act of reaching a cartridge and having one of her feet as far before the other as she

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture