Death in Venice Summary and Analysis of Chapter One my notes.docx - Death in Venice Summary and Analysis of Chapter One Summary The novel opens by

Death in Venice Summary and Analysis of Chapter One my notes.docx

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Death in Venice Summary and Analysis of Chapter OneSummary:The novel opens by introducing the great writer, Gustav Aschenbach, known since his fiftieth birthday as von Aschenbach. Von Aschenbach sets out on a solitary walk from his apartment in Munich and ruminates on his morning's work. It is early May, and as he passes through the Englischer Garten, he notices the weather is finally beginning to clear up. Von Aschenbach looks for a tram station at the NorthCemetery, and when he is unable to find one, focuses his attention on the Byzantine building nearby. He notices a figure in the portico, evidently a foreign tourist, grimacing into the sunlight. The figure is wearing a bast hat, and notices von Aschenbach observing him. Upon being discovered, the writer walks away in embarrassment.After noticing the tourist, von Aschenbach is struck with a sudden desire to travel, and imagines tropical scenes with lush vegetation. Previously, he had regarded tourism as merely an occasional diversion good for his health. Now that he is growing old and fears his artistic powers are faltering, he feels a sudden need to travel and escape from the duty of writing. Von Aschenbach had experienced writer's block that very morning and felt that, although his work is still well received by the public, it lacks the sparkle of his younger work. He feels his usual summer alone in the German countryside will not cure him, because he finds the environment as oppressive as the city. Von Aschenbach locates the tram station, and considers turning back to find the tourist, but can no longer see him.During the year described as 19— (probably 1911), the elderly Gustav von Aschenbach takes a walk alone in Munich, Germany. He is taking an afternoon break from his work as a writer. He finds himself walking alongside a cemetery and notices Greek crosses etched with religious phrases. Aschenbach sees

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