Art Midterm Essay.docx - K. Renon Rudy 10 October 2017 Art...

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K. Renon Rudy10 October 2017Art 1010Utah Valley UniversityAncient rulers often used art for political propaganda. For this question, choose one example of art orarchitecture from Mesopotamia, Egypt, and Rome (three works total) to explain how each of thesecultures specifically used artworks or buildings/monuments to represent the importance of the ruler. Beas specific as possible—make sure to include who each example was made for and what it represented.Also, make sure to include as many terms as possible as you explain the importance of each of theseexamples. Your answer should be no less than 1 page (single spaced).If we look at art, we can see that since the dawn of civilization it has been used for many reasons,including for political reason, even today we can it used politically.Is this essay, we will explore some ofthe ancient political uses of art in from Mesopotamia, Egypt, and Rome.Early artwork from Mesopotamia can sometimes be difficult to exactly place what it is representing,given that this civilization began thousands of years ago.There are many pieces that we can guess weresome kind of political statement, but we’re not sure whom they were for, or what they wererepresenting exactly.It was not until later that we saw here the beginning of the first written language,which later led to histories being written and taken into account.Thankfully, thanks to that writtenlanguage, and histories later being transcribed, the later artwork from Mesopotamia can be seen forwhat it was.One case of this is theVictory Stele of Naram-Sin.Naram-Sin was one of the kings of Mesopotamia, from 2261 BC – 2224 BC, the last great king of theAkkadian Empire, and grandson of Sargon the Great.Many consider him to be the most importantAkkadian ruler after his grandfather Sargon, some even say that he places ahead of Sargon.Both Sargonand Naram-Sin became near-mythological persons of legend and story, with sketches of their venturesbeing told in the culture thousands of years after they had passed.TheVictory Stele of Naram-Sintellsthe story of one of his victories, and was used politically to show his greatness to the people ofMesopotamia.At the top left of the stele, we see Naram-Sin himself stand erect, proud and tall, leading his army tovictory over the people of Lullubi from what is now present-day Iran.His army is shown just below him,marching in perfect formation up the mountain to battle, while the Lullubi cower and fall apart, manyfalling off of the mountain, in complete disarray.In the stele, Naram-Sin’s stance is a representation ofjust how great he is, putting him almost on the same level as the gods themselves.Naram-Sin is wearinga helmet with bull horns on it, signifying his divinity, assuming his importance and status of the gods.

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Term
Spring
Professor
AlexanderW.Bigney
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