Plant Tissues and Structures Lab, Fall 2019.docx - Name...

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Name _______________ PLANT TISSUES AND STRUCTURES Angiosperms (the flowering plants) are divided into 2 main groups based on a structure called the “seed leaf” or cotyledon. If a plant has 1 seed leaf, it is known as a monocotyledon or “ monocot ”. If a plant has 2 seed leaves, it is known as a dicotyledon or “ dicot With only a few exceptions, monocots are herbaceous ; dicots can be herbaceous or woody . Woody dicots are familiar trees such as oak, maple, ash, hickory, elm, etc. (Trees like pines, spruce and cedars are gymnosperms and so they are not included here.) While all flowering plants have the same general body plan with leaves, stems, roots, flowers and fruits, monocots and dicots have distinct differences in each of these structures. Some differences we can easily see, others will require us to use a microscope to see the differences. Complete the table below by describing the function for each plant part. Plant Part Function Leaves Stems (and Branches) Roots Flowers Fruits 1
Label the plant using the letter of the terms below. A. Apical Bud B. Axillary Bud C. Blade D. Flower E. Leaf F. Petiole G. Root H. Stem 2
1. LEAVES: To Do: Observe a leaf under the dissecting microscope Sketch and label the trichomes. What is the function of a trichome? To Do: Observe the leaf stomate on display at the compound microscope. Sketch and label the stomate. What is the function of the stomate? To Do : Observe the leaf specimens on display. Notice the veins of the leaves. Monocot leaves have parallel venation; dicot leaves have branched venation . Draw an example of a monocot leaf showing the venation. Draw an example of a dicot leaf showing the venation. 3

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