ENG 102 Hemingway Robert Penn Warren.pdf - Hemingway...

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HemingwayAuthor(s): Robert Penn WarrenSource:The Kenyon Review,Vol. 9, No. 1 (Winter, 1947), pp. 1-28Published by: Kenyon CollegeStable URL: Accessed: 08-11-2017 21:21 UTCJSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a widerange of content in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity andfacilitate new forms of scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact [email protected]Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of the Terms & Conditions of Use, available atKenyon Collegeis collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access toTheKenyon ReviewThis content downloaded from 132.174.254.102 on Wed, 08 Nov 2017 21:21:15 UTCAll use subject to
The Kenyon ReviewVol. IX WINTER, 1947 No. IRobert Penn WarrenHEMINGWAYT HE situations and characters of Hemingway's world areusually violent. There is the hard-drinking and sexually pro-miscuous world of The Sun Also Rises; the chaotic and brutalworld of war as in A Farewell to Arms, For Whom the Bell Tolls,many of the inserted sketches of In Our Time, the play The FifthColumn, and some of the stories; the world of sport, as in "FiftyGrand," "My Old Man," "The Undefeated," "The Snows ofKilimanjaro"; the world of crime as in "The Killers," "TheGambler, the Nun, and the Radio," and To Have and To HaveNot. Even when the situation of a story does not fall into one ofthese categories, it usually involves a desperate risk, and behind itis the shadow of ruin, physical or spiritual. As for the typicalcharacters, they are usually tough men, experienced in the hardworlds they inhabit, and not obviously given to emotional displayor sensitive shrinking, men like Rinaldi or Frederick Henry ofA Farewell to Arms, Robert Jordan of For Whom the Bell Tolls,Harry Morgan of To Have and To Have Not, the big-game hunterof "The Snows of Kilimanjaro," the old bull-fighter of "The Un-defeated," or the pugilist of "Fifty Grand." Or if the typicalcharacter is not of this seasoned order, he is a very young man, orboy, first entering the violent world and learning his first adjust-ment to it.We have said that the shadow of ruin is behind the typicalHemingway situation. The typical character faces defeat orThis content downloaded from 132.174.254.102 on Wed, 08 Nov 2017 21:21:15 UTCAll use subject to
2 KENYON REV I EW

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