elderly depression - RUNNING HEAD:GERIATRIC DEPRESSION 1...

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RUNNING HEAD: GERIATRIC DEPRESSION 1 Geriatric Depression Sara Nakkachi University of Massachusetts Boston Dr. Boeninger Determinants of Health Fall, 2017 Geriatric Depression is a psychiatric disorder in the elderly that causes a decrease in quality of life and functional impairment. Although depression is less prevalent in older adults
RUNNING HEAD: GERIATRIC DEPRESSION 2 than in younger adults, It can have negative effects on those experiencing its symptoms. Almost more than half of geriatric depression cases experience a first onset later in life (Fiske. Et. 2009) . Symptoms include feeling tired, helpless/ hopeless, loss of interest in activities/hobbies, trouble eating, sleeping and working. Elderly depression is influenced by multiple risk factors and using the biopsychosocial and the social-ecological model can help break down the biological, psychological, and social factors and how they pose risks of experiencing depression symptoms later in life. There also seems to be differences in depression prevalence by race and gender which shows great iniquity concerns. We should care about depression morbidity because it lowers the quality of life in elderly which raises suicide concerns. The Biopsychosocial approach regularly considers biological, psychological and social factors and how they interact to help the further understanding of health outcomes and well being. The Importance of understanding the social ecological model is crucial in discovering how beliefs and behaviors can be adapt in a social context. This proves the place matters theory to be true and that changing social environments can promote better health. (Ragin, 2015) While genetic risk factors are considerably used to identify depressive disorders in younger adults, Non-genetic biological risk factors are especially important in old age due to the age-related changes that make them more common in the elderly. Some of these risk factors include Serotonin dysregulation, vascular lesion changes, and cardiovascular illnesses (Fiske et al 2009). Although there is considerable evidence that late depression in a way can be driven by genetic disposition, twin studies prove genetic factors that explain only about 20% to 30% of differences of moods in the elderly (Blazer #14). Based on a study from Duke university medical center, it is found that dysregulation in the center serotonin neurotransmitter can influence geriatric depression . While this is often overlooked as a risk factor, it disrupts the sleeping
RUNNING HEAD: GERIATRIC DEPRESSION 3 patterns causing the person to be restless and irritable. This shows better explanation to why

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