Intro Politics - Kasinathan Politics 1/Sanders POLITICS 1...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

POLITICS 1: THE AMERICAN POLITICAL SYSTEM Siva Kasinathan Fall 2006––Professor Sanders Kasinathan Politics 1/Sanders Page 1 of 34
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

Table of Contents The Constitutional Convention & Federalist Papers 10 & 51 3 The Constitution 4 The Electoral College & Devolution 6 The Balance of Power in the Federal System 9 The Media 10 Patterns in the Media 11 Public Opinion 12 Parties and Voter Turnout 15 Voter Turnout and Picking Who We Vote For 18 Third Parties 21 The Executive Branch: An Introduction 23 Presidential Powers & Limits on Power 24 Limitations on Presidential Power (continued) 27 The Courts 29 Limitations on the Courts 32 Kasinathan Politics 1/Sanders Page 2 of 34
Image of page 2
Sep 5, 2006 The Constitutional Convention & Federalist Papers 10 & 51 The founders held meetings of the Constitutional Convention in secret because they didn t want legislatures to influence decisions made. The Bill of Rights represents a drastic change that came from criticisms of the Constitu- tion––an open process could have prevented the Bill from being a list of amendments, however increased openness could have stunted other deliberations. The Convention itself was radical since its original purpose was to rewrite the Articles, but the Convention produced a new document––the Articles took unanimous consent from the colonies. So, the Constitution would have never been passed as an amend- ment. The Constitution had an adoption procedure built in. The founders had no real governmental system to look to. The British model really wasn t a model since there wasn t an aristocracy or a king that existed. Pure democracy also didn t work because a small community is requisite. “If I don t know my neighbor s, I ll oppress them.” People are by their nature oppressive––as Madison said “If men were angels no gov- ernment would be necessary.” Madison is an economic determinist in his view that the unequal distribution of property causes the creation of faction. The definition of a faction is a group that looks out for itself rather than the public good or interest as Madison notes. Destroying the causes of faction, according to Madison, would entail destroying liberty and giving everyone the same opinion. So, it s pretty damn near impossible to destroy the causes, which means we have to deal the problem. Two ways to deal with the prob- lem: 1. Large republic (safeguards in three ways): [a] Size itself prevents factions from becoming large enough to oppress. [b] Representation prevents oppression since each representative will have to look out for more people since districts themselves will become bigger. Districts will be- come more heterogeneous so you can t just look out for one interest. [c] Number of “good” people––there are a lot more of good people (people like Madison) in a larger country since percentages remain constant. Doesn t make any sense.
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.
  • Fall '07
  • Sanders

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern