Deaf culture final essay.docx - DEAF CULTURE 1 Deaf culture...

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DEAF CULTURE 1 Deaf culture Novakovic, Lindsey (#B02005390) 2019FA1-HUSV-2035-03: Introduction to Human Services SUNY Empire State College
DEAF CULTURE 2 Table of Contents Deaf accessibility services ................................................................................................... 4 Deaf culture ......................................................................................................................... 4 History and importance of Deaf culture .......................................................................... 4 Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 ........................................................ 5 National Association for the Deaf (NAD) ................................................................... 6 World Federation for the Deaf (WFD) ........................................................................ 6 MORE HISTORY ........................................................................................................ 6 Understanding the thresholds of hearing ......................................................................... 6 Types of hearing loss ................................................................................................... 6 Causes of hearing loss ................................................................................................. 7 Devices to improve or restore hearing ......................................................................... 7 How Deaf children think, learn, and read ........................................................................ 8 Deaf cognition ............................................................................................................. 9 Learning and memory ................................................................................................ 11 Language and literacy ................................................................................................ 12 Barriers to Deaf accessibility ......................................................................................... 13 Accessibility of healthcare ......................................................................................... 13 Accessibility of fair assessment: Standardized assessments ..................................... 14 Debates and controversies in Deaf culture .................................................................... 15
DEAF CULTURE 3 Cochlear implants ...................................................................................................... 15 American Sign Language versus the Oral Method .................................................... 17 [Heading 3] ................................................................................................................ 19 References .......................................................................................................................... 21 Footnotes ............................................................................................................................ 23 Tables ................................................................................................................................. 24 Figures ............................................................................................................................... 27
DEAF CULTURE 4 Please answer TWO of the following questions of your choice: What is Deaf culture all about? How are Deaf children raised and educated and how should they be?
DEAF CULTURE 5 Deaf culture The known history of Deaf culture dates back to the 1700s and has consistently included a membership that is both diverse and spirited (Leigh, Andrews, Harris, 2018, p. xi). The perception of deafness is often misguided to include but are not limited to beliefs that the Deaf are limited in communication/cannot communicate, that they are disabled, and/or that they are isolated from society (p. 3). In understanding the difference between deaf and Deaf , one can appreciate the diverse needs of the deaf people. To be deaf is to be audibly unable to comprehend spoken language or hard of hearing; to be Deaf is to identify with a group of people who share values and customs related to their shared experiences (Leigh, Andrews, Harris, 2018, pp. 4-5). Most deaf people rely on auditory devices to adapt to hearing cultures and/or prefer spoken language, tending to associate and socialize more with hearing cultures (p. 5). Deaf people associate themselves with the lifestyle of being deaf in an accepting way—a way in which their deafness is not viewed as a disability or a cause of any “isolation”, a way in which they identify themselves as a whole person with a common lifestyle amongst a group of people (p. 5). History and importance of Deaf culture According to Leigh, Andrews, and Harris (2018), “roughly 2 to 3 of every 1,000 children in the United States are born deaf or hard of hearing (DHH). About 96% of deaf children are born to hearing parents” (p. 13). Imagine growing up being unable to immediately converse in a way that your parents or guardians do; immediately you may not know this is the life in which you have been born into, but they do—they know they need to find a method of communication come the “babbling stage” of development.

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