Background-Research_B02005390-Novakovic.docx - FINAL...

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FINAL PROJECT PART II: DEAF ACCESSIBILITY 1Deaf accessibilityNovakovic, Lindsey (#B02005390)2019FA1-HUSV-2035-03: Introduction to Human ServicesSUNY Empire State College
DEAF ACCESSIBILITY 2Table of ContentsBackground research: Deaf accessibility (Final project: Part II)..............3Barriers to Deaf accessibility..................................................................3Knowledge and prevention of HIV/AIDS..............................................3Standardized assessments..................................................................4Debates and controversies in Deaf culture............................................5Cochlear implants...............................................................................5American Sign Language....................................................................7References.............................................................................................9
DEAF ACCESSIBILITY 3Background research: Deaf accessibility (Final project: Part II)The following are resources peer-reviewed, scholarly works relating to Deaf accessibility in the United States in a relative form of an annotated bibliography. Each listed source will be followed by a summary of the source’s content.Barriers to Deaf accessibilityThe following scholarly works address two examples of barriers to Deafaccessibility.Knowledge and prevention of HIV/AIDSBat-Chava, Y., Martin, D., Kosciw, J., & Bat-Chava, Y. (2005). Barriers to HIV/AIDS knowledge and prevention among deaf and hard of hearing people. AIDS Care, 17(5), 623–634. Hearing loss can be caused by many things, but what most people may not know, is that hearing loss can be a result of HIV infection. It can also be a side effect of taking medication to treat the HIV virus. With roughly 10% of the country’s population being Deaf or hard of hearing (DHH), a team of researchers set out to investigate the obstacles that the minority of DHH people experience related to education and prevention of HIV/AIDS. In 2005, Bat-Chava, Martin, and Kosciw conducted focus groups and individual interviews of DHH people in New York State to test their theory that DHH people were less knowledgeable about causes, symptoms, treatment and
DEAF ACCESSIBILITY 4prevention of HIV/AIDS. Their research suggested that DHH American Sign Language (ASL) users were less informed about HIV/AIDS than speaking DHHparticipants; due to the lack of knowledge about HIV/AIDS, many DHH ASL users do not seek out medical attention until the illness has become severe. Bat-Chava et al. also found that DHH adolescents were more knowledgeable than DHH adults, and DHH participants living in urban areas had a higher exposure to information about HIV/AIDS. Bat-Chava et. al. share that these results likely demonstrate various barriers between the participants such as communication (i.e. English proficiency), level of education (how much schooling completed and the quality of education), and accessibility of services (e.g. due to lack of credentialed interpreters, many Deaf people learn information from each other, rather than from a formal source).

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