Topic-Selection_B02005390-Novakovic.docx - FINAL PROJECT...

This preview shows page 1 - 4 out of 7 pages.

FINAL PROJECT PART I: DEAF ACCESSIBILITY SERVICES 1 Deaf accessibility services Novakovic, Lindsey (#B02005390) 2019FA1-HUSV-2035-03: Introduction to Human Services SUNY Empire State College
DEAF ACCESSIBILITY SERVICES 2 Table of Contents Deaf accessibility services ..................................................................... 3 Deaf culture ............................................................................................ 3 History and importance of Deaf culture .............................................. 3 Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 ................................. 4 National Association for the Deaf (NAD) .......................................... 4 World Federation for the Deaf (WFD) ............................................... 5 References ............................................................................................. 6 Footnotes ............................................................................................... 7
DEAF ACCESSIBILITY SERVICES 3 Deaf accessibility services The known history of Deaf culture dates back to the 1700s and has consistently included a membership that is both diverse and spirited (Leigh, Andrews, Harris, 2018, p. xi). The perception of deafness is often misguided to include but are not limited to beliefs that the Deaf are limited in communication/cannot communicate, that they are disabled, and/or that they are isolated from society (p. 3). With increased education, support, and appreciation of Deaf culture, this misapprehension could change. Deaf culture In understanding the difference between deaf and Deaf , one can appreciate the diverse needs of the deaf people. To be deaf is to be audibly unable to comprehend spoken language or hard of hearing; to be Deaf is to identify with a group of people who share values and customs related to their shared experiences (Leigh, Andrews, Harris, 2018, pp. 4-5). Most deaf people rely on auditory devices to adapt to hearing cultures and/or prefer spoken language, tending to associate and socialize more with hearing cultures (p.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture