NUR1023 Module 2 - Session 1 and 2 (2)(1).pptx - Module 1 Session 1 Concept of Immunity Concept of Inflammation Immunity • The process that provides

NUR1023 Module 2 - Session 1 and 2 (2)(1).pptx - Module 1...

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Module 1 Session 1 Concept of Immunity Concept of Inflammation
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Immunity The process that provides an individual with protection or defense from disease. It is a characteristic that allows one to be resistant to a disease or condition
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Types of Immunity Innate Immunity Acquired Immunity Active immunity Passive immunity
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Immunity: Active and Passive
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Immunity: Three Primary Functions 1. Protects the body from invasion of microorganisms and other antigens 2. Removes dead or damaged tissue and cells 3. Recognizes and removes cell mutations that have demonstrated abnormal cell growth and development
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Immune System Lymphatic System Lymphoid Organs Blood
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Lymphocyte Function B Lymphocytes (B Cells) develop in in B one marrow Humoral Component of the immune response T Lymphocytes (T Cells) develop in the T hymus Cell mediated component of the immune response Complement System - Enhances or complements the immune system Amplify and increases the efficiency of other components of the immune system
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Immune Response
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Altered Immunity Conditions in which immune responses are either suppressed or exaggerated
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Suppressed Immune Response Individuals who have suppressed immune responses are in a state of immunodeficiency.
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Suppressed Immunity An inadequately functioning immune system that leaves the individual immunocompromised. An individual may be immunocompromised because of a dysfunctional immune system or may be induced to an immunocompromised status by medication or treatment for other diseases.
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Consequences of Suppressed Immune Response The two major types of problems that result from suppressed immune response are Infection Cancer
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Populations at Greatest Risk for Suppressed Immune Response Age: The very young, the immune system is immature, the elderly, loss of immune effectiveness. Nonimmunized State: Individuals who are not immunized are susceptible to several infections. Environmental Factors: Poor nutrition, exposure to pollutants, unsafe sanitary conditions, food and water contamination Chronic Illnesses: Depressed immune function can develop as a result of chronic illness or treatments for medical conditions. Others risk factors Medical Treatments Genetics High-Risk Behaviors and Substance Abuse Pregnancy
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Suppressed Immune Functioning Symptoms Report of frequent infections Report of poor wound healing Fatigue Malaise Weight loss Clinical Findings May appear poorly nourished or have wasting syndrome May have chronic wounds May have enlarged lymph nodes Presence of opportunistic infection
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Clinical Management Immunizations Avoid high-risk behaviors Adequate nutrition Exercise Infection control measures
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Collaborative Care: Immunosuppression Monitor immune function Good Nutrition Prevent opportunistic infections Monitor and treat opportunistic infections Drug therapy
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Exaggerated Immune Response To the far right of the immune response spectrum is an exaggerated immune response. Hyperimmune responses range among allergic reactions, cytotoxic reactions, and autoimmune reactions.
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