AFAM final - 1 Nicole Querica AFAM 335 Daniel McClure 1 May...

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1 Nicole Querica AFAM 335 Daniel McClure 1 May 2019 Final Voter suppression is finally being put on the minds of everyone. It has existed since voting itself existed, but the rights of minorities are finally on the agenda of the public, and it’s finally recognised for how terrible it was and is. Starting with photo identification laws and the piled on restrictions that are put on for the fun of it, going into the “Jim Crow” era, and finishing up in voter fraud, which goes hand in hand with suppression. Voter suppression is not a simple fix, and more than what is realized goes into the deep racially driven mindset that courses through the individuals creating these laws, or better yet, obstacles. According to the study written by Bentele, they found out that the photo identification laws are in fact extremely partisan, strategic, and racialized. “These findings are consistent with a scenario in which the targeted demobilization of minority voters and African Americans is a central driver of recent legislative developments.” (Bentele) These policies are within developments in the social welfare and criminal justice policies that collectively reduced voting privileges among the socially marginalized groups, like minorities. Bentele goes about to uncover this problem with a few tables and charts to map out if voter suppression is actually actively happening, and it shows true. “The proposal of restrictive voter access legislation has been substantially more likely to occur where
2 African-Americans are concentrated and both minorities and low-income individuals have begun turning out at the polls more frequently” (Bentele) Not even just noticeable, but substantially. While we don’t have obvious confessions that this happening is true, we can definitely infer that these results strongly suggest that “the proposal of these policies has been driven by electoral concerns differentially attuned to demobilizing African-American and lower-income Americans.” (Bentele) Patterns like these have a strong association and are consistent with the expectations taken from the knowledge on past voter suppression. The article by Hood also argues similar points in Georgia. In that study, using population data from two election cycles combined with information on a specific subgroup of individuals who are known to lack photo ID, they created an analysis of the Georgia voter ID law. “We find that the new law did produce a suppression effect among those registrants lacking proper ID. Substantively, the law lowered turnout by about four-tenths of a percentage point in 2008.” (Hood) In this study, it claims that they had no ethnic or racially charged emotions fueling these laws, but the statistics of who doesn’t typically have an identification card can speak for itself.

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